Individual differences in decision making: Drive and reward responsiveness affect strategic bargaining in economic games

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609999
Title:
Individual differences in decision making: Drive and reward responsiveness affect strategic bargaining in economic games
Author:
Scheres, Anouk; Sanfey, Alan
Affiliation:
Psychology Department, University of Arizona, 1503 E University Blvd., Tucson AZ 85721, USA
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Behavioral and Brain Functions 2006, 2:35 doi:10.1186/1744-9081-2-35
Journal:
Behavioral and Brain Functions
Rights:
© 2006 Scheres and Sanfey; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:In the growing body of literature on economic decision making, the main focus has typically been on explaining aggregate behavior, with little interest in individual differences despite considerable between-subject variability in decision responses. In this study, we were interested in asking to what degree individual differences in fundamental psychological processes can mediate economic decision-making behavior.METHODS:Specifically, we studied a personality dimension that may influence economic decision-making, the Behavioral Activation System, (BAS) which is composed of three components: Reward Responsiveness, Drive, and Fun Seeking. In order to assess economic decision making, we utilized two commonly-used tasks, the Ultimatum Game and Dictator Game. Individual differences in BAS were measured by completion of the BIS/BAS Scales, and correlations between the BAS scales and monetary offers made in the two tasks were computed.RESULTS:We found that higher scores on BAS Drive and on BAS Reward Responsiveness were associated with a pattern of higher offers on the Ultimatum Game, lower offers on the Dictator Game, and a correspondingly larger discrepancy between Ultimatum Game and Dictator Game offers.CONCLUSION:These findings are consistent with an interpretation that high scores on Drive and Reward Responsiveness are associated with a strategy that first seeks to maximize the likelihood of reward, and then to maximize the amount of reward. More generally, these results suggest that there are additional factors other than empathy, fairness and selfishness that contribute to strategic decision-making.
EISSN:
1744-9081
DOI:
10.1186/1744-9081-2-35
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.behavioralandbrainfunctions.com/content/2/1/35

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorScheres, Anouken
dc.contributor.authorSanfey, Alanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:56:03Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:56:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.citationBehavioral and Brain Functions 2006, 2:35 doi:10.1186/1744-9081-2-35en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1744-9081-2-35en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609999-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:In the growing body of literature on economic decision making, the main focus has typically been on explaining aggregate behavior, with little interest in individual differences despite considerable between-subject variability in decision responses. In this study, we were interested in asking to what degree individual differences in fundamental psychological processes can mediate economic decision-making behavior.METHODS:Specifically, we studied a personality dimension that may influence economic decision-making, the Behavioral Activation System, (BAS) which is composed of three components: Reward Responsiveness, Drive, and Fun Seeking. In order to assess economic decision making, we utilized two commonly-used tasks, the Ultimatum Game and Dictator Game. Individual differences in BAS were measured by completion of the BIS/BAS Scales, and correlations between the BAS scales and monetary offers made in the two tasks were computed.RESULTS:We found that higher scores on BAS Drive and on BAS Reward Responsiveness were associated with a pattern of higher offers on the Ultimatum Game, lower offers on the Dictator Game, and a correspondingly larger discrepancy between Ultimatum Game and Dictator Game offers.CONCLUSION:These findings are consistent with an interpretation that high scores on Drive and Reward Responsiveness are associated with a strategy that first seeks to maximize the likelihood of reward, and then to maximize the amount of reward. More generally, these results suggest that there are additional factors other than empathy, fairness and selfishness that contribute to strategic decision-making.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.behavioralandbrainfunctions.com/content/2/1/35en
dc.rights© 2006 Scheres and Sanfey; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleIndividual differences in decision making: Drive and reward responsiveness affect strategic bargaining in economic gamesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1744-9081en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychology Department, University of Arizona, 1503 E University Blvd., Tucson AZ 85721, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBehavioral and Brain Functionsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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