Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609850
Title:
E-Learning practice: Adding Humor to your Online Class
Author:
Stoll, Paul
Affiliation:
UA South Educational Technology
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Issue Date:
23-Apr-2016
Description:
This conference paper is a literature review about the use of humor in online learning. It reviews the theories of humor in education and lists best practices for using humor in an online class. / Paper submitted for ETCV 623.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609850
Abstract:
Abstract: There will always be instructors who use humor in their classes. While these practitioners have never numbered in the majority and often have been scorned by their peers, there has been a resilient insistence that humor has a place in education. As education moves more and more into online modalities, we find ourselves at a crossroad of opportunities. It has never been easier to find humorous content about any topic using technology. Simply searching Google for “humor in instruction” lists page after page of ideas, research and content designed for the classroom. At the same time, many of us are teaching in classes where we never see the people we teach. This can rob instructors of important feedback about whether their content (whether humorous or not) is connecting with the students. This literature review explores these crossroads, looking at the effectiveness of humor in teaching, theories that can guide humor in the classroom, types of humor to use in education, how to add humor to your online class and resources for implementing humor in your online class.
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
Humor; online learning

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStoll, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-19T14:24:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-19T14:24:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-23-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609850-
dc.descriptionThis conference paper is a literature review about the use of humor in online learning. It reviews the theories of humor in education and lists best practices for using humor in an online class. / Paper submitted for ETCV 623.en
dc.description.abstractAbstract: There will always be instructors who use humor in their classes. While these practitioners have never numbered in the majority and often have been scorned by their peers, there has been a resilient insistence that humor has a place in education. As education moves more and more into online modalities, we find ourselves at a crossroad of opportunities. It has never been easier to find humorous content about any topic using technology. Simply searching Google for “humor in instruction” lists page after page of ideas, research and content designed for the classroom. At the same time, many of us are teaching in classes where we never see the people we teach. This can rob instructors of important feedback about whether their content (whether humorous or not) is connecting with the students. This literature review explores these crossroads, looking at the effectiveness of humor in teaching, theories that can guide humor in the classroom, types of humor to use in education, how to add humor to your online class and resources for implementing humor in your online class.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the UA South Educational Technology Graduate Program and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subjectHumoren
dc.subjectonline learningen
dc.titleE-Learning practice: Adding Humor to your Online Classen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUA South Educational Technologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Educational Technology Graduate Papers collection. For more information about the Educational Technology Program at the University of Arizona, visit http://edtech.arizona.edu/. Email repository@u.library.arizona.edu with questions about items in this collection.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.