Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609693
Title:
HYPERVELOCITY TELEMETRY SYSTEM
Author:
Pereira, Carlos M.
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Armament Research; New Jersey Institute of Technology
Issue Date:
1997-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
This paper presents the development of a very high shock telemetry system designed to operate when subjected to acceleration forces of 50,000 g’s in a 120mm gun environment. This system consists of an RF transmitter, a ten channel FM/FM multiplexer, a very rugged power supply, a microstrip patch antenna, and a sensor module. The sensor module contains a tri-axial accelerometer designed to measure the projectile’s low in-flight radial and drag forces and two additional accelerometers to measure the projectile’s high in-bore setback and balloting forces. The sensor suite is located at the center of gravity of the projectile. The patch antenna is incorporated into a radiating structure consisting of a cylindrical metal tube and a plastic cover. To accommodate the antenna in the space available, a microstrip antenna is built on a substrate material that has a dielectric constant of e = 10. Though the cylindrical metal tube, in which the antenna is housed, acts as a cylindrical waveguide operating below its cut-off frequency, its relatively short length allows for adequate power to be radiated for proper system operation. The telemetry system uses standard off-the-shelf telemetry components that were modified and repackaged to withstand the 50,000 "g" environment. All components performed very well in preliminary high "g" (50,000 g’s) tests in a laboratory gun at the Army Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC).
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHYPERVELOCITY TELEMETRY SYSTEMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Army Armament Researchen
dc.contributor.departmentNew Jersey Institute of Technologyen
dc.date.issued1997-10-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the development of a very high shock telemetry system designed to operate when subjected to acceleration forces of 50,000 g’s in a 120mm gun environment. This system consists of an RF transmitter, a ten channel FM/FM multiplexer, a very rugged power supply, a microstrip patch antenna, and a sensor module. The sensor module contains a tri-axial accelerometer designed to measure the projectile’s low in-flight radial and drag forces and two additional accelerometers to measure the projectile’s high in-bore setback and balloting forces. The sensor suite is located at the center of gravity of the projectile. The patch antenna is incorporated into a radiating structure consisting of a cylindrical metal tube and a plastic cover. To accommodate the antenna in the space available, a microstrip antenna is built on a substrate material that has a dielectric constant of e = 10. Though the cylindrical metal tube, in which the antenna is housed, acts as a cylindrical waveguide operating below its cut-off frequency, its relatively short length allows for adequate power to be radiated for proper system operation. The telemetry system uses standard off-the-shelf telemetry components that were modified and repackaged to withstand the 50,000 "g" environment. All components performed very well in preliminary high "g" (50,000 g’s) tests in a laboratory gun at the Army Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC).en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609693-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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