Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609386
Title:
Telemedicine: Patient Monitoring in Unusual Environments
Author:
Hanley, John
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Issue Date:
1976-09
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Of the several advantages telemetry systems have to offer the burgeoning field of patient monitoring, we have previously stressed recording from freely moving patients unencumbered by lengthy cables and unattached to conventional bulky machines. Paramount in the applications of systems designed and fabricated in our laboratory of Environmental Neurobiology have been the monitoring of patients afflicted with temporal lobe epilepsy in which the capture of unilateral or bilateral EEG seizure activity dictates the possibility or futility of neurosurgical intervention (1). Together with sophisticated computer analyses of neurophysiological data, telemetry has also made it possible to identify EEG correlates of bizarre schizophrenic ritualistic behavior virtually impossible to capture by conventional hard-wire techniques (2). This presentation emphasizes another aspect of the utility of telemetry: the opportunity to record from patients in meaningful circumstances outside the sterile environs of the Neurophysiology Laboratory which sometimes involves freedom of movement and sometimes quiescence. The critical element in these situations is the unacceptability of bulky machinery and its attendant problems. Two such environments are the operating room and the sleep research and treatment laboratory or bedroom. Our current fairly extensive telemetry studies involve both of these surrounds. These activities will now be discussed.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTelemedicine: Patient Monitoring in Unusual Environmentsen_US
dc.contributor.authorHanley, Johnen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of California, Los Angelesen
dc.date.issued1976-09en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractOf the several advantages telemetry systems have to offer the burgeoning field of patient monitoring, we have previously stressed recording from freely moving patients unencumbered by lengthy cables and unattached to conventional bulky machines. Paramount in the applications of systems designed and fabricated in our laboratory of Environmental Neurobiology have been the monitoring of patients afflicted with temporal lobe epilepsy in which the capture of unilateral or bilateral EEG seizure activity dictates the possibility or futility of neurosurgical intervention (1). Together with sophisticated computer analyses of neurophysiological data, telemetry has also made it possible to identify EEG correlates of bizarre schizophrenic ritualistic behavior virtually impossible to capture by conventional hard-wire techniques (2). This presentation emphasizes another aspect of the utility of telemetry: the opportunity to record from patients in meaningful circumstances outside the sterile environs of the Neurophysiology Laboratory which sometimes involves freedom of movement and sometimes quiescence. The critical element in these situations is the unacceptability of bulky machinery and its attendant problems. Two such environments are the operating room and the sleep research and treatment laboratory or bedroom. Our current fairly extensive telemetry studies involve both of these surrounds. These activities will now be discussed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609386en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.