Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609359
Title:
RPV Applications in the U.S. Navy
Author:
Friichtenicht, R. D.
Affiliation:
Naval Air System Command Headquarters
Issue Date:
1975-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The continuing evolution to smaller, more reliable electronics packages has had a tremendous impact throughout industry and the world. One application that has just recently started receiving wide spread attention is Remotely Piloted vehicles (RPVS). The smaller computers, electro-optical devices, infra-red systems, etc. have brought the RPV out of its "model airplane" stage and into the military arena. RPVs offer some distinct advantages over manned aircraft, which places them in a very competitive position for accomplishment of selected missions. Cost savings promise to be significant and their comparatively small size make them attractive for operation from small naval ships. However, the Navy faces some unique problems that must be addressed before RPVs are an integral part of the Naval Forces. The most immediate and overriding problem is recovery. Not only is the recovery platform very small, but ship's movement through all three axis further complicates the problem. This paper discusses some of the possible naval applications of RPVs, and outlines the Navy's program for solving the recovery problem.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRPV Applications in the U.S. Navyen_US
dc.contributor.authorFriichtenicht, R. D.en
dc.contributor.departmentNaval Air System Command Headquartersen
dc.date.issued1975-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe continuing evolution to smaller, more reliable electronics packages has had a tremendous impact throughout industry and the world. One application that has just recently started receiving wide spread attention is Remotely Piloted vehicles (RPVS). The smaller computers, electro-optical devices, infra-red systems, etc. have brought the RPV out of its "model airplane" stage and into the military arena. RPVs offer some distinct advantages over manned aircraft, which places them in a very competitive position for accomplishment of selected missions. Cost savings promise to be significant and their comparatively small size make them attractive for operation from small naval ships. However, the Navy faces some unique problems that must be addressed before RPVs are an integral part of the Naval Forces. The most immediate and overriding problem is recovery. Not only is the recovery platform very small, but ship's movement through all three axis further complicates the problem. This paper discusses some of the possible naval applications of RPVs, and outlines the Navy's program for solving the recovery problem.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609359en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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