Forest Litter as a Seed Source in Coal Mine Reclamation in the Southwest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609138
Title:
Forest Litter as a Seed Source in Coal Mine Reclamation in the Southwest
Author:
Day, A. D.; Ludeke, K. L.
Affiliation:
University of Arizona; Ludeke Corporation
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
1990
Abstract:
Forest litter, a good source of organic matter and seeds, was applied on undisturbed soil and on coal mine soil (spoils) in experiments conducted on the Black Mesa Coal Mine near Kayenta, Arizona over a 2 -year period (1977 - 1978). Germination, seedling establishment, plant height, and ground cover were evaluated for two seeding treatments (forest litter and no forest litter) and two soil- moisture treatments (natural rainfall and natural rainfall plus irrigation). The forest litter was obtained at random from the Coconino National Forest, broadcast over the surface of the soil materials, and incorporated into the surface 5 cm of each soil material. Germination, seedling establishment, plant height, and ground cover on undisturbed soil and coal mine soil were higher when forest litter was applied than when it was not applied and when natural rainfall was supplemented with sprinkler irrigation than when rainfall was not supplemented with irrigation. Applications of forest litter and supplemental irrigation may insure successful establishment of vegetation on areas disturbed by open -pit coal mining.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDay, A. D.en
dc.contributor.authorLudeke, K. L.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-11T22:35:02Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-11T22:35:02Zen
dc.date.issued1990en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609138en
dc.description.abstractForest litter, a good source of organic matter and seeds, was applied on undisturbed soil and on coal mine soil (spoils) in experiments conducted on the Black Mesa Coal Mine near Kayenta, Arizona over a 2 -year period (1977 - 1978). Germination, seedling establishment, plant height, and ground cover were evaluated for two seeding treatments (forest litter and no forest litter) and two soil- moisture treatments (natural rainfall and natural rainfall plus irrigation). The forest litter was obtained at random from the Coconino National Forest, broadcast over the surface of the soil materials, and incorporated into the surface 5 cm of each soil material. Germination, seedling establishment, plant height, and ground cover on undisturbed soil and coal mine soil were higher when forest litter was applied than when it was not applied and when natural rainfall was supplemented with sprinkler irrigation than when rainfall was not supplemented with irrigation. Applications of forest litter and supplemental irrigation may insure successful establishment of vegetation on areas disturbed by open -pit coal mining.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleForest Litter as a Seed Source in Coal Mine Reclamation in the Southwesten_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentLudeke Corporationen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
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