Geomorphology and the Distributional Ecology of Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) in a Desert Riparian Canyon

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/609103
Title:
Geomorphology and the Distributional Ecology of Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) in a Desert Riparian Canyon
Author:
Asplund, Kenneth K.; Gooch, Michael T.
Affiliation:
Prescott College
Publisher:
University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Journal:
Desert Plants
Rights:
Copyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.
Collection Information:
Desert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.
Issue Date:
1988
Abstract:
DBH data were taken from Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) in a desert riparian canyon in west -central Arizona. Recruitment was found to depend on geomorphologic features and flood "refugia" rather than on the absence of grazing. Populus fremontii is specifically a "strandline," streamside species, particularly of braided aggradations and their associated secondary channels, a microhabitat that ultimately depends on upstream and upslope erosion. The concept of flood -subclimax succession explains virtually nothing of the ecology of obligate riparian trees. Riparian classification based upon geomorphology and hydrology are apt to have significant meaning for biogeography and management.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0734-3434

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAsplund, Kenneth K.en
dc.contributor.authorGooch, Michael T.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-11T21:47:36Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-11T21:47:36Zen
dc.date.issued1988en
dc.identifier.issn0734-3434en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/609103en
dc.description.abstractDBH data were taken from Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) in a desert riparian canyon in west -central Arizona. Recruitment was found to depend on geomorphologic features and flood "refugia" rather than on the absence of grazing. Populus fremontii is specifically a "strandline," streamside species, particularly of braided aggradations and their associated secondary channels, a microhabitat that ultimately depends on upstream and upslope erosion. The concept of flood -subclimax succession explains virtually nothing of the ecology of obligate riparian trees. Riparian classification based upon geomorphology and hydrology are apt to have significant meaning for biogeography and management.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.rightsCopyright © Arizona Board of Regents. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.titleGeomorphology and the Distributional Ecology of Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) in a Desert Riparian Canyonen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPrescott Collegeen
dc.identifier.journalDesert Plantsen
dc.description.collectioninformationDesert Plants is published by The University of Arizona for the Boyce Thompson Southwestern Arboretum. For more information about this unique botanical journal, please email the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications Office at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.