Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/608985
Title:
Experientially Guided Robots
Author:
Merriam, E. William; Becker, Joseph D.
Affiliation:
Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc.
Issue Date:
1974-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
This paper argues that an experientially guided robot Is necessary to successfully explore far-away planets. Such a robot is characterized as having sense organs which receive sensory information from its environment and motor systems which allow it to interact with that environment. The sensori-motor information which it receives is organized into an experiential knowledge structure and this knowledge in turn is used to guide the robot's future actions. A summary is presented of a problem solving system which is being used as a test bed for developing such a robot. The robot currently engages in the behaviors of visual tracking, focusing down, and looking around in a simulated Martian landscape. Finally, some unsolved problems are outlined whose solutions are necessary before an experientially guided robot can be produced. These problems center around organizing the motivational and memory structure of the robot and understanding its high-level control mechanisms. This paper discusses a project which is attempting to develop the "mind" of' a robot which will be capable of experiencing its environment, storing sensori-motor information, and then using its accumulated knowledge to guide its future actions. In Section I, we describe the sort of behavior that an experientially guided robot might exhibit, and we give some reasons why we might want such a thing. Then, in Section II, we discuss the current state of our project, and in Section III we indicate some important issues that are as yet unresolved.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleExperientially Guided Robotsen_US
dc.contributor.authorMerriam, E. Williamen
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Joseph D.en
dc.contributor.departmentBolt Beranek and Newman Inc.en
dc.date.issued1974-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThis paper argues that an experientially guided robot Is necessary to successfully explore far-away planets. Such a robot is characterized as having sense organs which receive sensory information from its environment and motor systems which allow it to interact with that environment. The sensori-motor information which it receives is organized into an experiential knowledge structure and this knowledge in turn is used to guide the robot's future actions. A summary is presented of a problem solving system which is being used as a test bed for developing such a robot. The robot currently engages in the behaviors of visual tracking, focusing down, and looking around in a simulated Martian landscape. Finally, some unsolved problems are outlined whose solutions are necessary before an experientially guided robot can be produced. These problems center around organizing the motivational and memory structure of the robot and understanding its high-level control mechanisms. This paper discusses a project which is attempting to develop the "mind" of' a robot which will be capable of experiencing its environment, storing sensori-motor information, and then using its accumulated knowledge to guide its future actions. In Section I, we describe the sort of behavior that an experientially guided robot might exhibit, and we give some reasons why we might want such a thing. Then, in Section II, we discuss the current state of our project, and in Section III we indicate some important issues that are as yet unresolved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/608985en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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