Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/608370
Title:
Flight Test: In Search of Boring Data
Author:
Hoaglund, Catharine M.; Gardner, Lee S.
Affiliation:
Edwards Air Force Base
Issue Date:
1996-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The challenge being faced today in the Department of Defense is to find ways to improve the systems acquisition process. One area needing improvement is to eliminate surprises in unexpected test data which add cost and time to developing the system. This amounts to eliminating errors in all phases of a system’s lifecycle. In a perfect world, the ideal systems acquisition process would result in a perfect system. Flawless testing of a perfect system would result in predicted test results 100% of the time. However, such close fidelity between predicted behavior and real behavior has never occurred. Until this ideal level of boredom in testing occurs, testing will remain a critical part of the acquisition process. Given the indispensability of testing, the goal to reduce the cost of flight tests is well worth pursuing. Reducing test cost equates to reducing open air test hours, our most costly budget item. It also means planning, implementing and controlling test cycles more efficiently. We are working on methods to set up test missions faster, and analyze, evaluate, and report on the test data more quickly, including unexpected results. This paper explores the moving focus concept, one method that shows promise in our pursuit of the goal of reducing test costs. The moving focus concept permits testers to change the data they collect and view during a test, interactively, in real-time. This allows testers who are receiving unexpected test results to change measurement subsets and explore the problem or pursue other test scenarios.
Keywords:
Flight Testing; Real-Time Telemetry; Network Data Flow; Process Improvement
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFlight Test: In Search of Boring Dataen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoaglund, Catharine M.en
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Lee S.en
dc.contributor.departmentEdwards Air Force Baseen
dc.date.issued1996-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe challenge being faced today in the Department of Defense is to find ways to improve the systems acquisition process. One area needing improvement is to eliminate surprises in unexpected test data which add cost and time to developing the system. This amounts to eliminating errors in all phases of a system’s lifecycle. In a perfect world, the ideal systems acquisition process would result in a perfect system. Flawless testing of a perfect system would result in predicted test results 100% of the time. However, such close fidelity between predicted behavior and real behavior has never occurred. Until this ideal level of boredom in testing occurs, testing will remain a critical part of the acquisition process. Given the indispensability of testing, the goal to reduce the cost of flight tests is well worth pursuing. Reducing test cost equates to reducing open air test hours, our most costly budget item. It also means planning, implementing and controlling test cycles more efficiently. We are working on methods to set up test missions faster, and analyze, evaluate, and report on the test data more quickly, including unexpected results. This paper explores the moving focus concept, one method that shows promise in our pursuit of the goal of reducing test costs. The moving focus concept permits testers to change the data they collect and view during a test, interactively, in real-time. This allows testers who are receiving unexpected test results to change measurement subsets and explore the problem or pursue other test scenarios.en
dc.subjectFlight Testingen
dc.subjectReal-Time Telemetryen
dc.subjectNetwork Data Flowen
dc.subjectProcess Improvementen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/608370en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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