Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/608365
Title:
CANISTER MULTIPATH AND THE CLOSE COUPLED ANTENNA
Author:
Guadiana, Juan M.; Rivera, Jesus; Jedlicka, Russel
Affiliation:
White Sands Missile Range; New Mexico State University
Issue Date:
1996-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The effects of multipath in telemetry applications are very well known and the approaches to minimizing these effects are the subject of countless books, papers and articles. Multipath once again rears its head as the U.S. Navy fields the MK-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS), a launching system in which each missile is housed in a canister which is both magazine and launch mechanism. The Canister is designed to protect the missile from Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI), Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and the environment. As can be expected, a canister designed to prevent Radio Frequency (RF) energy from entering should inherently prevent any RF from escaping, and renders the canister environment ripe with multipath. Pre-Launch telemetry checks, essential to the conduct of a missile flight test, become unreliable events which at times result in aborted missions. Today the “encanistered” missile system enjoys wide acceptance, in the U.S. as well as internationally. Since any missile radiating in a closed volume inherently suffers from these multipath degradations, it is important to disclose the results of Navy testing conducted on the canister as well as the mission observations of the multipath effects. The mission observations are described are “signature” traits of the degradations which should have been attributed to multipath. Clearly many missions and tests were affected, but most were simply ignored by an oblivious test team. A short summary of the canister multipath investigation follows,including unexpected findings, and finally a discussion is given on the Close Coupled Antenna and its effectiveness in mitigating the canister multipath.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCANISTER MULTIPATH AND THE CLOSE COUPLED ANTENNAen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuadiana, Juan M.en
dc.contributor.authorRivera, Jesusen
dc.contributor.authorJedlicka, Russelen
dc.contributor.departmentWhite Sands Missile Rangeen
dc.contributor.departmentNew Mexico State Universityen
dc.date.issued1996-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe effects of multipath in telemetry applications are very well known and the approaches to minimizing these effects are the subject of countless books, papers and articles. Multipath once again rears its head as the U.S. Navy fields the MK-41 Vertical Launching System (VLS), a launching system in which each missile is housed in a canister which is both magazine and launch mechanism. The Canister is designed to protect the missile from Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI), Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and the environment. As can be expected, a canister designed to prevent Radio Frequency (RF) energy from entering should inherently prevent any RF from escaping, and renders the canister environment ripe with multipath. Pre-Launch telemetry checks, essential to the conduct of a missile flight test, become unreliable events which at times result in aborted missions. Today the “encanistered” missile system enjoys wide acceptance, in the U.S. as well as internationally. Since any missile radiating in a closed volume inherently suffers from these multipath degradations, it is important to disclose the results of Navy testing conducted on the canister as well as the mission observations of the multipath effects. The mission observations are described are “signature” traits of the degradations which should have been attributed to multipath. Clearly many missions and tests were affected, but most were simply ignored by an oblivious test team. A short summary of the canister multipath investigation follows,including unexpected findings, and finally a discussion is given on the Close Coupled Antenna and its effectiveness in mitigating the canister multipath.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/608365en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.