Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/608307
Title:
MOBILE TRACKING SYSTEM “MOTION ON THE OCEAN” TEST
Author:
Pedroza, Moises
Affiliation:
White Sands Missile Range
Issue Date:
1999-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The Transportable Range Augmentation and Control System (TRACS), Mobile Telemetry System (MTS), is a versatile system capable of supporting anywhere when called upon. The MTS is designed to operate anywhere on land. It is unknown how the system will perform on a floating platform without a stabilizing gimbal. The operation of a tracking system at sea generally require the use of a three-axis pedestal. The MTS is a two-axis pedestal. This paper is a report on how the MTS responds to simulated ocean-motion. Testing the system on a body of water is very expensive, especially out in the desert. The MTS was tested in the desert area of Las Cruces, New Mexico in the parking lot of EMI Technologies, prime contractor, using two forklifts to simulate ship motion in the pitch and yaw planes. The location is perfect for crossover dynamics tests. The tests conducted were for the purpose of determining if the MTS could auto-track a moving signal in space while it also moves due to “simulated ocean swells” that increase the generated tracking error signal levels in an opposite or in addition to the ones generated from the space vehicle. There is no gyroscopic correction. Successful results of the tests could preclude the use of a gyroscopically stabilized gimbaled platform necessary to keep the tracking system steady for auto-tracking a target during “6 degrees of freedom” disturbances. Several thousand dollars can be saved if the concept can be proven.
Keywords:
Gimbal; gyroscopic correction; autotrack; tracking errors; pitch; yaw plane movements; autotrack threshold setting; slave track; memory track
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleMOBILE TRACKING SYSTEM “MOTION ON THE OCEAN” TESTen_US
dc.contributor.authorPedroza, Moisesen
dc.contributor.departmentWhite Sands Missile Rangeen
dc.date.issued1999-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe Transportable Range Augmentation and Control System (TRACS), Mobile Telemetry System (MTS), is a versatile system capable of supporting anywhere when called upon. The MTS is designed to operate anywhere on land. It is unknown how the system will perform on a floating platform without a stabilizing gimbal. The operation of a tracking system at sea generally require the use of a three-axis pedestal. The MTS is a two-axis pedestal. This paper is a report on how the MTS responds to simulated ocean-motion. Testing the system on a body of water is very expensive, especially out in the desert. The MTS was tested in the desert area of Las Cruces, New Mexico in the parking lot of EMI Technologies, prime contractor, using two forklifts to simulate ship motion in the pitch and yaw planes. The location is perfect for crossover dynamics tests. The tests conducted were for the purpose of determining if the MTS could auto-track a moving signal in space while it also moves due to “simulated ocean swells” that increase the generated tracking error signal levels in an opposite or in addition to the ones generated from the space vehicle. There is no gyroscopic correction. Successful results of the tests could preclude the use of a gyroscopically stabilized gimbaled platform necessary to keep the tracking system steady for auto-tracking a target during “6 degrees of freedom” disturbances. Several thousand dollars can be saved if the concept can be proven.en
dc.subjectGimbalen
dc.subjectgyroscopic correctionen
dc.subjectautotracken
dc.subjecttracking errorsen
dc.subjectpitchen
dc.subjectyaw plane movementsen
dc.subjectautotrack threshold settingen
dc.subjectslave tracken
dc.subjectmemory tracken
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/608307en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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