Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/607722
Title:
Apolipoprotein e4, cognition, and behavior in youth with Down syndrome
Author:
Smith, R.; Edgin, J.
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology; Department of Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences
Issue Date:
2014-11-07
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Given the early emergence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) related pathology in Down syndrome (DS; Trisomy 21), it is possible that changes may be evident in childhood or adolescence in Apolipoprotein (APOE) e3/e4 or e4/e4 genotypes in relation to e3/e3 genotypes. Given findings of early involvement of striatum amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide deposition in DS, we propose that a profile of executive and inhibitory control dysfunction will be found in youth carrying the risk e4 allele. From a pool of 72 children and adolescents with DS we examined a sub-sample with the risk e4 allele (n = 8; e3/e4) and without the risk e4 allele (n = 8; e3/e3). Participants were matched for age and ethnicity (range 8 - 21 years; mean age 14 years). Karyotypes were gathered from medical records, confirming a diagnosis of Trisomy 21. We collected genetic information (Oragene saliva kit) in home; they were sent to the Emory Biomarker Service Center to determine genotypes. We administered the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT-2) and a set of cognitive outcomes measures validated for Down syndrome, the Arizona Cognitive Test Battery. Results from the KBIT-2 indicated no significant differences in verbal raw score (p = 0.65), non-verbal raw score (p = 0.69), or intelligence quotient (IQ) (p = 0.32). Neuropsychological test scores did differ; with poorer performance in the e4 sample on the CANTAB Paired Associates Learning task (p = 0.05) and parent/caregiver reports of working memory (p = 0.08). Therefore, as early as adolescence some changes may be seen in e4 carriers.
Description:
Poster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, November 7th, 2014, University of Arizona.
Keywords:
Down syndrome; APOE; cognition; Apolipoprotein e4; behavior
Sponsors:
Andrew Carnie, PhD and the UROC-PREP program; Families of participants Sonoran UCEDD; LuMind Foundation; Research Down Syndrome; Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium; The National Down Syndrome Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, R.en
dc.contributor.authorEdgin, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-02T19:56:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-02T19:56:37Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/607722en
dc.descriptionPoster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, November 7th, 2014, University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractGiven the early emergence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) related pathology in Down syndrome (DS; Trisomy 21), it is possible that changes may be evident in childhood or adolescence in Apolipoprotein (APOE) e3/e4 or e4/e4 genotypes in relation to e3/e3 genotypes. Given findings of early involvement of striatum amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide deposition in DS, we propose that a profile of executive and inhibitory control dysfunction will be found in youth carrying the risk e4 allele. From a pool of 72 children and adolescents with DS we examined a sub-sample with the risk e4 allele (n = 8; e3/e4) and without the risk e4 allele (n = 8; e3/e3). Participants were matched for age and ethnicity (range 8 - 21 years; mean age 14 years). Karyotypes were gathered from medical records, confirming a diagnosis of Trisomy 21. We collected genetic information (Oragene saliva kit) in home; they were sent to the Emory Biomarker Service Center to determine genotypes. We administered the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT-2) and a set of cognitive outcomes measures validated for Down syndrome, the Arizona Cognitive Test Battery. Results from the KBIT-2 indicated no significant differences in verbal raw score (p = 0.65), non-verbal raw score (p = 0.69), or intelligence quotient (IQ) (p = 0.32). Neuropsychological test scores did differ; with poorer performance in the e4 sample on the CANTAB Paired Associates Learning task (p = 0.05) and parent/caregiver reports of working memory (p = 0.08). Therefore, as early as adolescence some changes may be seen in e4 carriers.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAndrew Carnie, PhD and the UROC-PREP programen
dc.description.sponsorshipFamilies of participants Sonoran UCEDDen
dc.description.sponsorshipLuMind Foundationen
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch Down Syndromeen
dc.description.sponsorshipArizona Alzheimer's Consortiumen
dc.description.sponsorshipThe National Down Syndrome Societyen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectDown syndromeen
dc.subjectAPOEen
dc.subjectcognitionen
dc.subjectApolipoprotein e4en
dc.subjectbehavioren
dc.titleApolipoprotein e4, cognition, and behavior in youth with Down syndromeen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciencesen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.en_US
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