Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/607348
Title:
SELF-ORIENTING AND LOCATING UNIT
Author:
Briggs, James R.; Youssef, Ahmed H.
Affiliation:
Edwards Air Force Base
Issue Date:
1998-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Optical trackers are often used at the Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) and at other Department of Defense (DoD) ranges to collect video and trajectory data for real-time display and postflight processing. When optical trackers are used in remote areas, pointing data from radar is utilized to enable the trackers to initially acquire targets. To enable the trackers to use radar-pointing data, offsets to true north must first be known. This offset is taken into account given the current position of the optical tracker. During postflight processing, when determining the trajectory of the target, the offsets are also taken into account to produce an accurate trajectory solution. Current methods of determining offsets to true north are time consuming and involve a lot of guesswork. Typically, a map and a known landmark are used to determine the offsets to true north. Another method is to look for the North Star (Polaris) and input an estimated offset. This paper will describe an inexpensive, stand-alone system that utilizes the Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine these offsets. This device may be modified and integrated with other systems that may need to point accurately. For example, a gun barrel on a tank may need to point accurately to within a degree. This device may also be used to accurately position telemetry antennas.
Keywords:
True north offset; self-orienting; inexpensive stand-alone unit; GPS; telemetry
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSELF-ORIENTING AND LOCATING UNITen_US
dc.contributor.authorBriggs, James R.en
dc.contributor.authorYoussef, Ahmed H.en
dc.contributor.departmentEdwards Air Force Baseen
dc.date.issued1998-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractOptical trackers are often used at the Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) and at other Department of Defense (DoD) ranges to collect video and trajectory data for real-time display and postflight processing. When optical trackers are used in remote areas, pointing data from radar is utilized to enable the trackers to initially acquire targets. To enable the trackers to use radar-pointing data, offsets to true north must first be known. This offset is taken into account given the current position of the optical tracker. During postflight processing, when determining the trajectory of the target, the offsets are also taken into account to produce an accurate trajectory solution. Current methods of determining offsets to true north are time consuming and involve a lot of guesswork. Typically, a map and a known landmark are used to determine the offsets to true north. Another method is to look for the North Star (Polaris) and input an estimated offset. This paper will describe an inexpensive, stand-alone system that utilizes the Global Positioning System (GPS) to determine these offsets. This device may be modified and integrated with other systems that may need to point accurately. For example, a gun barrel on a tank may need to point accurately to within a degree. This device may also be used to accurately position telemetry antennas.en
dc.subjectTrue north offseten
dc.subjectself-orientingen
dc.subjectinexpensive stand-alone uniten
dc.subjectGPSen
dc.subjecttelemetryen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/607348en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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