Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/606992
Title:
Quartz Crystals Units for High G Environments
Author:
Bernstein, M.
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Electronics Command
Issue Date:
1970-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Quartz crystal units are commonly used to achieve frequency accuracy of the order of 100 parts per million or better. The usual crystal mechanical environments are quite benign compared with those encountered In high g telemetry, however, and the normal shock tests are only 100 g's. The preliminary, design of a ruggedized high frequency crystal unit is shown as well as test date on the behavior of these units when subjected to 15,000 g's of impact shock. A crystal resonator is quite fragile since at 20 MHz an AT resonator is only 3 thousandths of an inch in thickness. Higher frequency units appear to have a g limit only slightly in excess of 20,000 g's. At lower frequencies, the resonator is not the limiting element but the supports and bonds become unreliable. A trade-off must be made between a very stiff support, which will increase the acceptable g level, and the concomitant frequency instability due to changes in mechanical stress on the quartz resonator. These stress changes can be caused both by differential thermal expansion of the mount and quartz as well as by shock Induced effects.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleQuartz Crystals Units for High G Environmentsen_US
dc.contributor.authorBernstein, M.en
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Army Electronics Commanden
dc.date.issued1970-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractQuartz crystal units are commonly used to achieve frequency accuracy of the order of 100 parts per million or better. The usual crystal mechanical environments are quite benign compared with those encountered In high g telemetry, however, and the normal shock tests are only 100 g's. The preliminary, design of a ruggedized high frequency crystal unit is shown as well as test date on the behavior of these units when subjected to 15,000 g's of impact shock. A crystal resonator is quite fragile since at 20 MHz an AT resonator is only 3 thousandths of an inch in thickness. Higher frequency units appear to have a g limit only slightly in excess of 20,000 g's. At lower frequencies, the resonator is not the limiting element but the supports and bonds become unreliable. A trade-off must be made between a very stiff support, which will increase the acceptable g level, and the concomitant frequency instability due to changes in mechanical stress on the quartz resonator. These stress changes can be caused both by differential thermal expansion of the mount and quartz as well as by shock Induced effects.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/606992en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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