Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/606691
Title:
Concepts of Integrated Adaptive Data Transmission Systems
Author:
Filipowsky, Richard F.
Affiliation:
IBM
Issue Date:
1969-09
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Telemetry systems require the transmission of information in analog, sampled, and digital forms. There also are requirements for spectrum conservation, for minimum spurious transmission outside the assigned band, and for highest flexibility in multiplexing and in accepting a wide range of sensors. The paper describes the conceptual design of an advanced information transmission system that operates basically in the sampled mode, but that can accept analog inputs through an information compressing sampler or digital inputs by taking one sample of each input bit and making binary decisions in the receiver. The system uses three different encoding processes in an integrated manner. The first encoding process is performed by a redundancy reducing computer-like subsystem called the contractive encoder. Its purpose is to eliminate unnecessary samples while keeping the essential samples at their correct place on the time scale. Repetition of already transmitted samples. or the insertion of samples from other channels will fill the space of samples that have been removed. The second encoding process is performed by a distributive encoder. The purpose of this part of the information processor is the protection of the information against sudden pulsive disturbances. The distributive encoder spreads the information content of each sample over tens to hundreds of other samples in an ordered manner. If, during transmission, one sample or a group of samples is heavily mutilated by pulsive disturbances, the corresponding decoder in the receiver will recover most of the information of these mutilated samples from the other undisturbed samples while spreading the energy of the pulsive disturbances over all samples so that it contributes only a negligibly small error to any one of them. The third encoding process is performed by the modulative encoder. This device has the task of shaping the samples that are produced by the distributive encoder into bandlimited waveforms so that a noise-like, bandlimited composite transmission signal with a uniform spectral distribution is finally fed into the communication channel. Many adaptive features and the option to use a return channel for repetitions of blocks of samples give the system high stability, high efficiency, and low error ratio.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleConcepts of Integrated Adaptive Data Transmission Systemsen_US
dc.contributor.authorFilipowsky, Richard F.en
dc.contributor.departmentIBMen
dc.date.issued1969-09en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractTelemetry systems require the transmission of information in analog, sampled, and digital forms. There also are requirements for spectrum conservation, for minimum spurious transmission outside the assigned band, and for highest flexibility in multiplexing and in accepting a wide range of sensors. The paper describes the conceptual design of an advanced information transmission system that operates basically in the sampled mode, but that can accept analog inputs through an information compressing sampler or digital inputs by taking one sample of each input bit and making binary decisions in the receiver. The system uses three different encoding processes in an integrated manner. The first encoding process is performed by a redundancy reducing computer-like subsystem called the contractive encoder. Its purpose is to eliminate unnecessary samples while keeping the essential samples at their correct place on the time scale. Repetition of already transmitted samples. or the insertion of samples from other channels will fill the space of samples that have been removed. The second encoding process is performed by a distributive encoder. The purpose of this part of the information processor is the protection of the information against sudden pulsive disturbances. The distributive encoder spreads the information content of each sample over tens to hundreds of other samples in an ordered manner. If, during transmission, one sample or a group of samples is heavily mutilated by pulsive disturbances, the corresponding decoder in the receiver will recover most of the information of these mutilated samples from the other undisturbed samples while spreading the energy of the pulsive disturbances over all samples so that it contributes only a negligibly small error to any one of them. The third encoding process is performed by the modulative encoder. This device has the task of shaping the samples that are produced by the distributive encoder into bandlimited waveforms so that a noise-like, bandlimited composite transmission signal with a uniform spectral distribution is finally fed into the communication channel. Many adaptive features and the option to use a return channel for repetitions of blocks of samples give the system high stability, high efficiency, and low error ratio.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/606691en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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