Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/606541
Title:
Preliminary Experiment Results from the Omega Position Location Equipment (OPLE)
Author:
Horiuchi, H. S.
Affiliation:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Issue Date:
1968-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The analysis of data taken during the fixed platform, road and aircraft tests indicates that the OPLE system can locate a fixed or moving platform with reasonable accuracy. During the fixed platform interrogations, it was found that the error in the OPLE-derived position estimates were consistently correlated with the error in the position estimates of the OCC as derived from the local Omega monitors; that is, latitude and longitude errors of corresponding magnitudes were received at the OCC both from the PEP's and from the Omega receiver located at the control center. Based on the data analyzed thus far for the fixed platforms, the overall contribution to the mean position error by the OPLE equipment ranges between 50 to 400 feet in latitude and 300 to 500 feet in longitude. The results have shown that the longitude errors are consistently greater than the latitude errors. The results of the road test indicated that a moving vehicle could be located with good accuracy. Men the OPLE-derived position estimates were adjusted for the navigational errors of the Omega system, the vehicle was located to within 1500 feet of the roadway. The results of the aircraft tests showed that an airborne platform moving at 160 knots could be located with reasonably good accuracy. During the daytime test, the position of the aircraft could be placed to within approximately 5 miles of GSFC. During the evening tests, the position of the aircraft was located to within 10 miles of the estimated center of the aircraft's circular flight pattern, the position being consistently to the east of the center of the circle. During these evening tests, the position of the OCC was calculated to be 4 miles east of its actual location.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePreliminary Experiment Results from the Omega Position Location Equipment (OPLE)en_US
dc.contributor.authorHoriuchi, H. S.en
dc.contributor.departmentNASA/Goddard Space Flight Centeren
dc.date.issued1968-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe analysis of data taken during the fixed platform, road and aircraft tests indicates that the OPLE system can locate a fixed or moving platform with reasonable accuracy. During the fixed platform interrogations, it was found that the error in the OPLE-derived position estimates were consistently correlated with the error in the position estimates of the OCC as derived from the local Omega monitors; that is, latitude and longitude errors of corresponding magnitudes were received at the OCC both from the PEP's and from the Omega receiver located at the control center. Based on the data analyzed thus far for the fixed platforms, the overall contribution to the mean position error by the OPLE equipment ranges between 50 to 400 feet in latitude and 300 to 500 feet in longitude. The results have shown that the longitude errors are consistently greater than the latitude errors. The results of the road test indicated that a moving vehicle could be located with good accuracy. Men the OPLE-derived position estimates were adjusted for the navigational errors of the Omega system, the vehicle was located to within 1500 feet of the roadway. The results of the aircraft tests showed that an airborne platform moving at 160 knots could be located with reasonably good accuracy. During the daytime test, the position of the aircraft could be placed to within approximately 5 miles of GSFC. During the evening tests, the position of the aircraft was located to within 10 miles of the estimated center of the aircraft's circular flight pattern, the position being consistently to the east of the center of the circle. During these evening tests, the position of the OCC was calculated to be 4 miles east of its actual location.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/606541en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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