Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/606142
Title:
Data Acquisition Blasts Off - Space Flight Testing
Author:
Curry, Diarmuid
Affiliation:
ACRA Control Inc.
Issue Date:
2009-10
Rights:
Copyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
In principle, the requirements for a flight test data acquisition system for space testing (launch vehicles, orbiters, satellites and International Space Station (ISS) installations) are very similar to those for more earth-bound applications. In practice, there are important environmental and operational differences that present challenges for both users and vendors of flight test equipment. Environmental issues include the severe vibration and shock experienced on take-off, followed by a very sharp thermal shock, culminating (for orbital vehicles) in a low temperature, low pressure, high radiation operating environment. Operational issues can include the need to dynamically adapt to changing configurations (for example when an instrumented stage is released) and the difficulty in Telemetering data during the initial launch stage from a vehicle that may not be recoverable, and therefore does not offer the option of an on-board recorder. Addressing these challenges requires simple, rugged and flexible solutions. Traditionally these solutions have been bespoke, specifically designed equipment. In an increasingly cost-conscious environment engineers are now looking to commercial off-the-shelf solutions. This paper discusses these solutions and highlights the issues that instrumentation engineers need to consider when designing or selecting flight test equipment.
Keywords:
Flight test; data acquisition system; space testing
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleData Acquisition Blasts Off - Space Flight Testingen_US
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Diarmuiden
dc.contributor.departmentACRA Control Inc.en
dc.date.issued2009-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractIn principle, the requirements for a flight test data acquisition system for space testing (launch vehicles, orbiters, satellites and International Space Station (ISS) installations) are very similar to those for more earth-bound applications. In practice, there are important environmental and operational differences that present challenges for both users and vendors of flight test equipment. Environmental issues include the severe vibration and shock experienced on take-off, followed by a very sharp thermal shock, culminating (for orbital vehicles) in a low temperature, low pressure, high radiation operating environment. Operational issues can include the need to dynamically adapt to changing configurations (for example when an instrumented stage is released) and the difficulty in Telemetering data during the initial launch stage from a vehicle that may not be recoverable, and therefore does not offer the option of an on-board recorder. Addressing these challenges requires simple, rugged and flexible solutions. Traditionally these solutions have been bespoke, specifically designed equipment. In an increasingly cost-conscious environment engineers are now looking to commercial off-the-shelf solutions. This paper discusses these solutions and highlights the issues that instrumentation engineers need to consider when designing or selecting flight test equipment.en
dc.subjectFlight testen
dc.subjectdata acquisition systemen
dc.subjectspace testingen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/606142en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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