Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/605532
Title:
REDUNDANT AREA CODING SYSTEM (REARCS)
Author:
Maier, James L.; Gardenhire, Lawrence
Affiliation:
Rome Air Development Center; Harris Intertype Corporation
Issue Date:
1972-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Redundant area coding was proposed in an Air Force patent, James Maier inventor, to relieve the long integration time required to transmit a reconnaissance photograph through narrow-band communication circuits where upper limits of 4800 to 9600 bits/second prevail. Further development by Radiation Systems Division was funded by Rome Air Development Center’s Reconnaissance and Intelligence Division. Mr. Lawrence Gardenhire developed the analysis curves used. As redundant area coding was conceived, unimportant areas were reduced by applying different orders of resolution throughout one frame of imagery, by blanking redundant areas, or by applying encoding so one frame could consist of areas basically unchanged and areas coded to represent special land such as Forest or desert. What evolved were techniques of applying redundant reduction algorithms in both areas, producing a low/ high resolution picture. Where 3 to 1 reduction ratios were optimum for an average “busy” picture, reduction ratios exceeding 10 to I have been realized. A 9 x 9 inch, 2000 x 2000, 6-bit grey level picture that required 42 minutes to send at a 9600-bit/ second rate, or about 14 minutes for a 3 to 1 reduction, can now be sent in 5 to 6 minutes. A 10 to 1 reduction ratio makes transmitting imagery through existing ground circuits more of a reality and fulfills user requirements.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleREDUNDANT AREA CODING SYSTEM (REARCS)en_US
dc.contributor.authorMaier, James L.en
dc.contributor.authorGardenhire, Lawrenceen
dc.contributor.departmentRome Air Development Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentHarris Intertype Corporationen
dc.date.issued1972-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractRedundant area coding was proposed in an Air Force patent, James Maier inventor, to relieve the long integration time required to transmit a reconnaissance photograph through narrow-band communication circuits where upper limits of 4800 to 9600 bits/second prevail. Further development by Radiation Systems Division was funded by Rome Air Development Center’s Reconnaissance and Intelligence Division. Mr. Lawrence Gardenhire developed the analysis curves used. As redundant area coding was conceived, unimportant areas were reduced by applying different orders of resolution throughout one frame of imagery, by blanking redundant areas, or by applying encoding so one frame could consist of areas basically unchanged and areas coded to represent special land such as Forest or desert. What evolved were techniques of applying redundant reduction algorithms in both areas, producing a low/ high resolution picture. Where 3 to 1 reduction ratios were optimum for an average “busy” picture, reduction ratios exceeding 10 to I have been realized. A 9 x 9 inch, 2000 x 2000, 6-bit grey level picture that required 42 minutes to send at a 9600-bit/ second rate, or about 14 minutes for a 3 to 1 reduction, can now be sent in 5 to 6 minutes. A 10 to 1 reduction ratio makes transmitting imagery through existing ground circuits more of a reality and fulfills user requirements.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/605532en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.