Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/605526
Title:
A NARROWBAND, CRYSTAL CONTROLLED BIOMEDICAL TELEMETRY SYSTEM
Author:
Westbrook, Richard M.; Fryer, Thomas B.
Affiliation:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Issue Date:
1972-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
A miniature, single-channel, crystal-controlled transmitter has been developed for biomedical applications. A narrowband frequency modulation (±7 kHz) of the RF is used to achieve maximum operating range with minimum transmitting power. The radiated power is limited to stay within the 50 μv/m at 15 m FCC requirement for low power transmitters (Part 15.212 FCC Regulations) in the 88 to 108 MHz band. This technique offers a number of advantages. First only manufacturer’s type approval is required for the device and the user does not need a license. Second maximum operating range can be achieved within the FCC power limitations by using a narrowband that is consistent with the required medical information bandwidth. A third advantage in using the 88 to 108 MHz band is that the commercial FM stations are relatively widely spaced and carefully regulated so that by selecting the transmitter’s frequency in the guard band between stations, minimum interference from other transmitter sources is encountered. For EKG and EEG applications, where an information bandwidth of 0.1 to 150 Hz is adequate, a subcarrier with a fixed frequency (approximately 1 kHz) is used with differential pulse width modulation (DPWM). This type of subcarrier has the advantage of simple circuitry for both the transmitter and demodulator. Since DPWM is self-aligning, it can be handled effectively by magnetic tape recorders having relatively high tape speed errors. For EMG and other high frequency data signals the RF can be directly frequency modulated without the use of a subcarrier.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA NARROWBAND, CRYSTAL CONTROLLED BIOMEDICAL TELEMETRY SYSTEMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWestbrook, Richard M.en
dc.contributor.authorFryer, Thomas B.en
dc.contributor.departmentNational Aeronautics and Space Administrationen
dc.date.issued1972-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractA miniature, single-channel, crystal-controlled transmitter has been developed for biomedical applications. A narrowband frequency modulation (±7 kHz) of the RF is used to achieve maximum operating range with minimum transmitting power. The radiated power is limited to stay within the 50 μv/m at 15 m FCC requirement for low power transmitters (Part 15.212 FCC Regulations) in the 88 to 108 MHz band. This technique offers a number of advantages. First only manufacturer’s type approval is required for the device and the user does not need a license. Second maximum operating range can be achieved within the FCC power limitations by using a narrowband that is consistent with the required medical information bandwidth. A third advantage in using the 88 to 108 MHz band is that the commercial FM stations are relatively widely spaced and carefully regulated so that by selecting the transmitter’s frequency in the guard band between stations, minimum interference from other transmitter sources is encountered. For EKG and EEG applications, where an information bandwidth of 0.1 to 150 Hz is adequate, a subcarrier with a fixed frequency (approximately 1 kHz) is used with differential pulse width modulation (DPWM). This type of subcarrier has the advantage of simple circuitry for both the transmitter and demodulator. Since DPWM is self-aligning, it can be handled effectively by magnetic tape recorders having relatively high tape speed errors. For EMG and other high frequency data signals the RF can be directly frequency modulated without the use of a subcarrier.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/605526en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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