Countering Colonialism in Border Communities: Leadership, Education, and the Politics of Multicultural Recognition

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/605200
Title:
Countering Colonialism in Border Communities: Leadership, Education, and the Politics of Multicultural Recognition
Author:
Villasenor, Elia M.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 25-Jul-2016
Abstract:
Operating from Postcolonial theory and using Honneth (1994), and Taylor (1995) conception of Multicultural recognition, Yosso's (2005) Community Cultural Wealth, and studies on Culturally Responsive Leadership, this dissertation presents three empirical studies that evidence the necessity of a global decolonization towards multicultural recognition. The first study shed light of a recognized Indigenous school that struggles for recognition and counters colonial domination. Findings demonstrated how a culturally responsive shared leadership fosters academic achievement and cultural pride. The second study provides an example of resilience and community cultural wealth in a group of repatriated students from the United States to Mexico, at the same time presents a re-conceptualization of cultural capital concept (Bourdieu, 1997), as a guide for recognition of cultural wealth within migrant communities. The final study examines how Southern Arizona principals conceptualize and enact successful leadership in border schools with shifting demographics and high percentages of colonized populations. Findings indicate that, along with Leithwood and Riehl's leadership dimensions, all four principals demonstrate a sociocultural affect as part of successful practice in Arizona border contexts.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Multicultural Recognition; Postcolonialism; Educational Leadership; Community Cultural Wealth
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Leadership
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ylimaki, Rose M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCountering Colonialism in Border Communities: Leadership, Education, and the Politics of Multicultural Recognitionen_US
dc.creatorVillasenor, Elia M.en
dc.contributor.authorVillasenor, Elia M.en
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease 25-Jul-2016en
dc.description.abstractOperating from Postcolonial theory and using Honneth (1994), and Taylor (1995) conception of Multicultural recognition, Yosso's (2005) Community Cultural Wealth, and studies on Culturally Responsive Leadership, this dissertation presents three empirical studies that evidence the necessity of a global decolonization towards multicultural recognition. The first study shed light of a recognized Indigenous school that struggles for recognition and counters colonial domination. Findings demonstrated how a culturally responsive shared leadership fosters academic achievement and cultural pride. The second study provides an example of resilience and community cultural wealth in a group of repatriated students from the United States to Mexico, at the same time presents a re-conceptualization of cultural capital concept (Bourdieu, 1997), as a guide for recognition of cultural wealth within migrant communities. The final study examines how Southern Arizona principals conceptualize and enact successful leadership in border schools with shifting demographics and high percentages of colonized populations. Findings indicate that, along with Leithwood and Riehl's leadership dimensions, all four principals demonstrate a sociocultural affect as part of successful practice in Arizona border contexts.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMulticultural Recognitionen
dc.subjectPostcolonialismen
dc.subjectEducational Leadershipen
dc.subjectCommunity Cultural Wealthen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorYlimaki, Rose M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberYlimaki, Rose M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBennett, Jeffreyen
dc.contributor.committeememberCombs, Mary Carolen
dc.contributor.committeememberSlater, Charlesen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.