Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/605049
Title:
PLANNING FOR NON-INTRUSIVE & EMBEDDED INSTRUMENTATION
Author:
Carpenter, Robert E.; Schneider, Dennis
Affiliation:
ATSS, Inc.; U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation Training, & Instumentation
Issue Date:
2005-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Embedded Instrumentation (EI) and Non-Intrusive Instrumentation (NII) integrates data collection and processing capabilities into the design of a system for diagnostics, prognostics, testing, and training. EI and NII will provide decision makers with the data needed to adequately describe performance and mitigate risks throughout a programs lifecycle. DoD weapon systems have become very complex, with intricate electronics and guidance requirements to meet the mission. Many platforms, such as Army munitions, no longer have the internal space to append instrumentation after they are sent for testing, yet the data needs from a complex weapon system have increased, with the need to understand the operational health and characteristics of many sophisticated electronics systems within the weapon system. Furthermore, the developer must ensure the platform used for test or for training is representative of the full up tactical system to retain integrity. Recent implementation of policy changes will allow responsible activities to have test, training and logistical resources shared at the program concept and maintain the integrity of lifecycle requirements. To assure success, EI/NII must be planned for at the beginning of the acquisition phase, with capabilities needed and costs / benefits considered. There have been significant advances in miniaturized telemetry and instrumentation technology, such as ASIC based transmitters and encoders, however there are still needed improvements to reduce the size and cost of embedded instrumentation components. Failing to continue to foster the on-going development of EI/NII technologies, and failing to foster the incorporation of such systems into new weapons could ultimately hinder the success of initiatives such as Army transformation and could certainly raise the costs associated with development, fielding, and operation of complex weapons.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePLANNING FOR NON-INTRUSIVE & EMBEDDED INSTRUMENTATIONen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Robert E.en
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Dennisen
dc.contributor.departmentATSS, Inc.en
dc.contributor.departmentU.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation Training, & Instumentationen
dc.date.issued2005-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractEmbedded Instrumentation (EI) and Non-Intrusive Instrumentation (NII) integrates data collection and processing capabilities into the design of a system for diagnostics, prognostics, testing, and training. EI and NII will provide decision makers with the data needed to adequately describe performance and mitigate risks throughout a programs lifecycle. DoD weapon systems have become very complex, with intricate electronics and guidance requirements to meet the mission. Many platforms, such as Army munitions, no longer have the internal space to append instrumentation after they are sent for testing, yet the data needs from a complex weapon system have increased, with the need to understand the operational health and characteristics of many sophisticated electronics systems within the weapon system. Furthermore, the developer must ensure the platform used for test or for training is representative of the full up tactical system to retain integrity. Recent implementation of policy changes will allow responsible activities to have test, training and logistical resources shared at the program concept and maintain the integrity of lifecycle requirements. To assure success, EI/NII must be planned for at the beginning of the acquisition phase, with capabilities needed and costs / benefits considered. There have been significant advances in miniaturized telemetry and instrumentation technology, such as ASIC based transmitters and encoders, however there are still needed improvements to reduce the size and cost of embedded instrumentation components. Failing to continue to foster the on-going development of EI/NII technologies, and failing to foster the incorporation of such systems into new weapons could ultimately hinder the success of initiatives such as Army transformation and could certainly raise the costs associated with development, fielding, and operation of complex weapons.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/605049en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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