Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/604866
Title:
Individual Differences in Degraded Speech Perception
Author:
Carbonell, Kathy M.
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of the lasting concerns in audiology is the unexplained individual differences in speech perception performance even for individuals with similar audiograms. One proposal is that there are cognitive/perceptual individual differences underlying this vulnerability and that these differences are present in normal hearing (NH) individuals but do not reveal themselves in studies that use clear speech produced in quiet (because of a ceiling effect). However, previous studies have failed to uncover cognitive/perceptual variables that explain much of the variance in NH performance on more challenging degraded speech tasks. This lack of strong correlations may be due to either examining the wrong measures (e.g., working memory capacity) or to there being no reliable differences in degraded speech performance in NH listeners (i.e., variability in performance is due to measurement noise). The proposed project has 3 aims; the first, is to establish whether there are reliable individual differences in degraded speech performance for NH listeners that are sustained both across degradation types (speech in noise, compressed speech, noise-vocoded speech) and across multiple testing sessions. The second aim is to establish whether there are reliable differences in NH listeners' ability to adapt their phonetic categories based on short-term statistics both across tasks and across sessions; and finally, to determine whether performance on degraded speech perception tasks are correlated with performance on phonetic adaptability tasks, thus establishing a possible explanatory variable for individual differences in speech perception for NH and hearing impaired listeners.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Individual Differences; Perceptual Flexibility; Speech Perception; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences; Degraded Speech
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech, Language, & Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Huanping, Dai; Wedel, Andrew

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIndividual Differences in Degraded Speech Perceptionen_US
dc.creatorCarbonell, Kathy M.en
dc.contributor.authorCarbonell, Kathy M.en
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractOne of the lasting concerns in audiology is the unexplained individual differences in speech perception performance even for individuals with similar audiograms. One proposal is that there are cognitive/perceptual individual differences underlying this vulnerability and that these differences are present in normal hearing (NH) individuals but do not reveal themselves in studies that use clear speech produced in quiet (because of a ceiling effect). However, previous studies have failed to uncover cognitive/perceptual variables that explain much of the variance in NH performance on more challenging degraded speech tasks. This lack of strong correlations may be due to either examining the wrong measures (e.g., working memory capacity) or to there being no reliable differences in degraded speech performance in NH listeners (i.e., variability in performance is due to measurement noise). The proposed project has 3 aims; the first, is to establish whether there are reliable individual differences in degraded speech performance for NH listeners that are sustained both across degradation types (speech in noise, compressed speech, noise-vocoded speech) and across multiple testing sessions. The second aim is to establish whether there are reliable differences in NH listeners' ability to adapt their phonetic categories based on short-term statistics both across tasks and across sessions; and finally, to determine whether performance on degraded speech perception tasks are correlated with performance on phonetic adaptability tasks, thus establishing a possible explanatory variable for individual differences in speech perception for NH and hearing impaired listeners.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectIndividual Differencesen
dc.subjectPerceptual Flexibilityen
dc.subjectSpeech Perceptionen
dc.subjectSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen
dc.subjectDegraded Speechen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, & Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHuanping, Daien
dc.contributor.advisorWedel, Andrewen
dc.contributor.committeememberHuanping, Daien
dc.contributor.committeememberWedel, Andrewen
dc.contributor.committeememberCurtin, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.committeememberWarner, Natashaen
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Stephenen
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