Different Faces, Different Voices: A Film Analysis of Power Imbalance in Gender-Dominated Societies

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/604655
Title:
Different Faces, Different Voices: A Film Analysis of Power Imbalance in Gender-Dominated Societies
Author:
Diaz, Kassandra
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology
Issue Date:
2014-11-07
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
No amount research need be referenced to justify the consensus that a power differential exists among women and men. The outcome that this power differential has created, however, varies from one society to another. The role of women in male-dominated societies is deconstructed through two films, each situated in the drug trafficking industry—one set in Latin America and the other in the United States-Mexico border. While substantial literature explores the gender power differential in the United States and developing countries, little attention is given to the impact of gender participation in the developing world. Each of these countries has diverse expectations with gender politics; that is, some countries have women as leaders in suffrage reforms and corporations, while women in other countries are not even granted the right to divorce. This paper examines the relationship between gender participation of women and their defiance of the power differential as depicted in the Brazilian film City of God and the American film Traffic. While no evidence is independently presented that economic development provides a basis for equal participation, the most important factors such as gender violence and civil liberties provide a means of understanding the gender gap from a sociopolitical perspective.
Description:
Poster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, November 7th, 2014, University of Arizona. This research has been presented at the 2014 Annual Student Showcase, where first prize recognition in the College of Humanities was received. An earlier version was presented at the 24th Annual Graduate and Professional Symposium on Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literature, Language and Culture. Recognition as the first undergraduate poster presented at the graduate symposium was received, as well as an award for Best Paper. Special recognition is due primarily to Dr. Katia Bezerra, head of the Department of Spanish & Portugese, for extending an offer for me to present, to Edgard Ore-Giron for private mentorship of my work, and to Akeem Flavors in the Department of Art History for willingly assisting me practice my presentation skills.
Keywords:
women; film; gender politics; City of God; Traffic; gender inequality

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, Kassandraen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-06T20:55:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-06T20:55:17Zen
dc.date.issued2014-11-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/604655en
dc.descriptionPoster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, November 7th, 2014, University of Arizona. This research has been presented at the 2014 Annual Student Showcase, where first prize recognition in the College of Humanities was received. An earlier version was presented at the 24th Annual Graduate and Professional Symposium on Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literature, Language and Culture. Recognition as the first undergraduate poster presented at the graduate symposium was received, as well as an award for Best Paper. Special recognition is due primarily to Dr. Katia Bezerra, head of the Department of Spanish & Portugese, for extending an offer for me to present, to Edgard Ore-Giron for private mentorship of my work, and to Akeem Flavors in the Department of Art History for willingly assisting me practice my presentation skills.en
dc.description.abstractNo amount research need be referenced to justify the consensus that a power differential exists among women and men. The outcome that this power differential has created, however, varies from one society to another. The role of women in male-dominated societies is deconstructed through two films, each situated in the drug trafficking industry—one set in Latin America and the other in the United States-Mexico border. While substantial literature explores the gender power differential in the United States and developing countries, little attention is given to the impact of gender participation in the developing world. Each of these countries has diverse expectations with gender politics; that is, some countries have women as leaders in suffrage reforms and corporations, while women in other countries are not even granted the right to divorce. This paper examines the relationship between gender participation of women and their defiance of the power differential as depicted in the Brazilian film City of God and the American film Traffic. While no evidence is independently presented that economic development provides a basis for equal participation, the most important factors such as gender violence and civil liberties provide a means of understanding the gender gap from a sociopolitical perspective.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.subjectfilmen
dc.subjectgender politicsen
dc.subjectCity of Goden
dc.subjectTrafficen
dc.subjectgender inequalityen
dc.titleDifferent Faces, Different Voices: A Film Analysis of Power Imbalance in Gender-Dominated Societiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.en_US
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