Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Survival Among People Diagnosed with HIV in Arizona, 1998‐2012

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603675
Title:
Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Survival Among People Diagnosed with HIV in Arizona, 1998‐2012
Author:
Mun, Elijah
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
25-Mar-2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2016 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
Objectives. We described the racial/ethnic disparities in survival among people diagnosed with HIV in Arizona from 1998 to 2012. We determined whether these disparities widened when adjusting for AIDS diagnosis, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, and gender. Methods. We compared survival from all causes between Whites and Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asians, and Multiple/Other races via Kaplan‐Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard models controlling for various clinical factors. Results. Multiple/Other races (1.85), Native Americans (1.28), and Blacks (1.19) have statistically significant higher hazard ratios in all‐cause mortality than Whites. When adjusting for AIDS diagnosis, these disparities widened and also showed Hispanics to have greater mortality [Multiple/Other races (2.53), Native Americans (1.44), Blacks (1.43), and Hispanics (1.22)]. Conclusions. Racial/ethnic minorities with HIV, specifically Black, Native Americans, and Multiple races, have significantly decreased overall survival. These disparities widen when considering the AIDS population. Further studies and resources could help identify the cause of these disparities and help generate a solution to diminish the survival gap.
MeSH Subjects:
HIV; Arizona; Healthcare Disparities; Cultural Diversity
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Gonzalez, Jonathan MA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRacial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV Survival Among People Diagnosed with HIV in Arizona, 1998‐2012en_US
dc.contributor.authorMun, Elijahen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2016-03-25en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2016 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractObjectives. We described the racial/ethnic disparities in survival among people diagnosed with HIV in Arizona from 1998 to 2012. We determined whether these disparities widened when adjusting for AIDS diagnosis, age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, and gender. Methods. We compared survival from all causes between Whites and Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asians, and Multiple/Other races via Kaplan‐Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard models controlling for various clinical factors. Results. Multiple/Other races (1.85), Native Americans (1.28), and Blacks (1.19) have statistically significant higher hazard ratios in all‐cause mortality than Whites. When adjusting for AIDS diagnosis, these disparities widened and also showed Hispanics to have greater mortality [Multiple/Other races (2.53), Native Americans (1.44), Blacks (1.43), and Hispanics (1.22)]. Conclusions. Racial/ethnic minorities with HIV, specifically Black, Native Americans, and Multiple races, have significantly decreased overall survival. These disparities widen when considering the AIDS population. Further studies and resources could help identify the cause of these disparities and help generate a solution to diminish the survival gap.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subject.meshHIVen
dc.subject.meshArizonaen
dc.subject.meshHealthcare Disparitiesen
dc.subject.meshCultural Diversityen
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorGonzalez, Jonathan MAen
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