Morphological examination of the relationship between astrocyte-like glia and neuronal synapses in Drosophila

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603647
Title:
Morphological examination of the relationship between astrocyte-like glia and neuronal synapses in Drosophila
Author:
Liu, Kendra; MacNamee, Sarah; Gerhard, Stephen; Fetter, Richard; Cardona, Albert; Tolbert, Leslie; Oland, Lynne
Affiliation:
University of Arizona Department of Neuroscience; Undergraduate Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science; HHMI Janelia Research Campus; Institute of Neuroinformatics, Zurich, Switzerland
Issue Date:
2016-02-24
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The nervous system is composed of two types of cells: neurons and glia. In neuronal circuits, neurons communicate through synapses and glia play a crucial modulatory role. To modulate chemical reuptake, glia send processes close to synapses and many glia directly appose or ensheathe a synapse. This structural motif is one of the elements often included in describing a vertebrate tripartite synapse, which includes a bidirectional functional neuron-glia relationship. The exact nature of this neuron-glia communication is not well understood. In the invertebrate fruit fly, we have also found that particular neurons and glia also have a bidirectional functional relationship. This allows us to ask new questions about glial morphology. Throughout multiple images, I identified particular neuronal synapses and surrounding glia. After creating a 3D reconstruction, I measured the distance between a particular neuronal synapse and its closest glial process. Interestingly, the neuronal synapses were not directly apposed or ensheathed by glia, and the distance to the closest glial process varied one-hundred-fold. With variable distance, functional communication is consistently present. These findings provide important insight into invertebrate neuron-glia communication, and offer new avenues to investigate the structural neuron-glia relationships that are required for reciprocal signaling between the two cell classes.
Description:
Poster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, February 24th, 2016, University of Arizona. Recipient of the 2016 Katheryne B. Willock Library Research Award.
Keywords:
Neuron-glia interactions; Electron microscopy; 3D reconstruction
Sponsors:
The Microscopy Society of America Undergraduate Research Scholarship; NSCS Summer Research Program; Van de Verde Undergraduate Research Scholarship in Science; NSF Graduate Research Fellowship; Howard Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campus; National Science Foundation Grant (IOS-1353739)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Kendraen
dc.contributor.authorMacNamee, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorGerhard, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorFetter, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorCardona, Alberten
dc.contributor.authorTolbert, Leslieen
dc.contributor.authorOland, Lynneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-24T23:26:32Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-24T23:26:32Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-24en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/603647en
dc.descriptionPoster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, February 24th, 2016, University of Arizona. Recipient of the 2016 Katheryne B. Willock Library Research Award.en
dc.description.abstractThe nervous system is composed of two types of cells: neurons and glia. In neuronal circuits, neurons communicate through synapses and glia play a crucial modulatory role. To modulate chemical reuptake, glia send processes close to synapses and many glia directly appose or ensheathe a synapse. This structural motif is one of the elements often included in describing a vertebrate tripartite synapse, which includes a bidirectional functional neuron-glia relationship. The exact nature of this neuron-glia communication is not well understood. In the invertebrate fruit fly, we have also found that particular neurons and glia also have a bidirectional functional relationship. This allows us to ask new questions about glial morphology. Throughout multiple images, I identified particular neuronal synapses and surrounding glia. After creating a 3D reconstruction, I measured the distance between a particular neuronal synapse and its closest glial process. Interestingly, the neuronal synapses were not directly apposed or ensheathed by glia, and the distance to the closest glial process varied one-hundred-fold. With variable distance, functional communication is consistently present. These findings provide important insight into invertebrate neuron-glia communication, and offer new avenues to investigate the structural neuron-glia relationships that are required for reciprocal signaling between the two cell classes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Microscopy Society of America Undergraduate Research Scholarshipen
dc.description.sponsorshipNSCS Summer Research Programen
dc.description.sponsorshipVan de Verde Undergraduate Research Scholarship in Scienceen
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF Graduate Research Fellowshipen
dc.description.sponsorshipHoward Hughes Medical Institute Janelia Research Campusen
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation Grant (IOS-1353739)en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectNeuron-glia interactionsen
dc.subjectElectron microscopyen
dc.subject3D reconstructionen
dc.titleMorphological examination of the relationship between astrocyte-like glia and neuronal synapses in Drosophilaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona Department of Neuroscienceen
dc.contributor.departmentUndergraduate Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
dc.contributor.departmentHHMI Janelia Research Campusen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Neuroinformatics, Zurich, Switzerlanden
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.en_US
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