Skin Disorders Encountered at a Pediatric Homeless Clinic: A Retrospective Chart Review

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603588
Title:
Skin Disorders Encountered at a Pediatric Homeless Clinic: A Retrospective Chart Review
Author:
Balasuriya, Lilanthi
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
23-Mar-2016
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2016 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Limited information about skin problems in homeless children exists in the current literature. RESEARCH QUESTION: Our objective was to classify the types of skin conditions commonly seen in a pediatric homeless clinic as compared to that of a large tertiary care children’s hospital dermatology clinic. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children treated by pediatric dermatologists at a homeless clinic, and compared the diagnoses to what was seen at a general pediatric dermatology clinic. RESULTS: There were 100 visits for 75 patients at the homeless clinic during the study period of 33 months. Within the homeless clinic visits, 62% of patient’s reported living in a shelter. In the homeless population the most common diagnoses were atopic dermatitis (31.0%), acne (27.0%), other dermatitis (7.0%), molluscum (6.0%), warts (5.0%) and nevi (4.0%). In the nonhomeless population, the most common diagnoses were atopic dermatitis (19.2%), contact dermatitis (9.7%), hemangioma (9.5%), acne (9.4%), nevus, non‐neoplastic (6.8%) and benign neoplasm of the skin (6.3%). CONCLUSION: Homeless and non‐homeless children suffer from similar conditions such as atopic dermatitis, acne and nevi. With the growing homeless pediatric population and their exposure to unsheltered environments, further studies are needed to investigate the skin conditions affecting this population.
MeSH Subjects:
Skin Diseases; Pediatrics; Homeless Persons; Infant; Child; Adolescent
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
O’Haver, Judy PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSkin Disorders Encountered at a Pediatric Homeless Clinic: A Retrospective Chart Reviewen_US
dc.contributor.authorBalasuriya, Lilanthien
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.date.issued2016-03-23en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2016 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Limited information about skin problems in homeless children exists in the current literature. RESEARCH QUESTION: Our objective was to classify the types of skin conditions commonly seen in a pediatric homeless clinic as compared to that of a large tertiary care children’s hospital dermatology clinic. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children treated by pediatric dermatologists at a homeless clinic, and compared the diagnoses to what was seen at a general pediatric dermatology clinic. RESULTS: There were 100 visits for 75 patients at the homeless clinic during the study period of 33 months. Within the homeless clinic visits, 62% of patient’s reported living in a shelter. In the homeless population the most common diagnoses were atopic dermatitis (31.0%), acne (27.0%), other dermatitis (7.0%), molluscum (6.0%), warts (5.0%) and nevi (4.0%). In the nonhomeless population, the most common diagnoses were atopic dermatitis (19.2%), contact dermatitis (9.7%), hemangioma (9.5%), acne (9.4%), nevus, non‐neoplastic (6.8%) and benign neoplasm of the skin (6.3%). CONCLUSION: Homeless and non‐homeless children suffer from similar conditions such as atopic dermatitis, acne and nevi. With the growing homeless pediatric population and their exposure to unsheltered environments, further studies are needed to investigate the skin conditions affecting this population.en
dc.typeThesisen
dc.subject.meshSkin Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshPediatricsen
dc.subject.meshHomeless Personsen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.contributor.mentorO’Haver, Judy PhDen
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