Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603583
Title:
Lampung Language Revitalization Program Evaluation
Author:
Putra, Kristian Adi
Affiliation:
Second Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT) Graduate Interdisciplinary Program
Issue Date:
2016-02-24
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
This project was aimed at evaluating the implementation of Lampung language revitalization program in educational settings in Indonesia. The result of this project was used as input for the improvement of the design of the program and for the formulation of language planning and policies that could effectively support the success of the program. Lampung language is an indigenous language primarily spoken in the Province of Lampung, Indonesia. The language has two dialects: Lampung Api and Lampung Nyo. In 2000, Lampung Api had 827,000 speakers, and Lampung Nyo had 180,000 speakers (Lewis, et.al, 2015). In spite of these figures, native Lampung ethnics under 20 years old commonly do not speak the language anymore both at home and outside, as they prefer speaking in Indonesian. Gunarwan (1994) even predicted that in 75 – 100 years, the language could be extinct. Since 1997, the language has been taught for 2 hours a week in grade 1 – 12. However, the result has never been evaluated, although the trend of diglossia remains strong and more massive. This study, then, tried to fill this gap.
Description:
Poster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, February 24th, 2016, University of Arizona.
Keywords:
Lampung; Language Revitalization
Sponsors:
The Endangered Language Fund; Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPutra, Kristian Adien
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T21:14:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-23T21:14:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-24en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/603583en
dc.descriptionPoster exhibited at GPSC Student Showcase, February 24th, 2016, University of Arizona.en
dc.description.abstractThis project was aimed at evaluating the implementation of Lampung language revitalization program in educational settings in Indonesia. The result of this project was used as input for the improvement of the design of the program and for the formulation of language planning and policies that could effectively support the success of the program. Lampung language is an indigenous language primarily spoken in the Province of Lampung, Indonesia. The language has two dialects: Lampung Api and Lampung Nyo. In 2000, Lampung Api had 827,000 speakers, and Lampung Nyo had 180,000 speakers (Lewis, et.al, 2015). In spite of these figures, native Lampung ethnics under 20 years old commonly do not speak the language anymore both at home and outside, as they prefer speaking in Indonesian. Gunarwan (1994) even predicted that in 75 – 100 years, the language could be extinct. Since 1997, the language has been taught for 2 hours a week in grade 1 – 12. However, the result has never been evaluated, although the trend of diglossia remains strong and more massive. This study, then, tried to fill this gap.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Endangered Language Funden
dc.description.sponsorshipIndonesia Endowment Fund for Education (LPDP)en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author.en_US
dc.subjectLampungen
dc.subjectLanguage Revitalizationen
dc.titleLampung Language Revitalization Program Evaluationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSecond Language Acquisition and Teaching (SLAT) Graduate Interdisciplinary Programen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the GPSC Student Showcase collection. For more information about the Student Showcase, please email the GPSC (Graduate and Professional Student Council) at gpsc@email.arizona.edu.en_US
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