Integration of Phase Change Materials in Commercial Buildings for Thermal Regulation and Energy Efficiency

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603534
Title:
Integration of Phase Change Materials in Commercial Buildings for Thermal Regulation and Energy Efficiency
Author:
Malekzadeh, Fatemeh
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of prospective procedures of absorbing thermal energy and releasing it during the required time is the application of phase change materials known as PCMs in building envelopes. High thermal energy storage (TES) materials has been a technology that effects the energy efficiency of a building by contributing in using onsite resources and reducing cooling or heating loads. Currently, many TES systems are emerging and contributing in building assemblies, however using an appropriate type of TES in a specific building and climate requires an in-depth knowledge of their properties. This research aims to provide a thorough review of a broad range of thermal energy storage technologies including their potential application in buildings. Subsequently, a comparative study and simulation between a basecase and an optimized model by PCM is thoroughly considered to understand the effect of high thermal storage building's shell on energy efficiency and indoor thermal comfort. Specifically this study proposes that the incorporation of PCM into glazing system as a high thermal capacity system will improve windows thermal performance and thermal capacity to varying climatic conditions. The generated results by eQUEST energy modeling software demonstrates approximately 25% reduction in cooling loads during the summer and 10% reduction in heating loads during the winter for optimized office building by PCM in hot arid climate of Arizona. Besides, using PCM in glazing system will reduce heat gain through the windows by conduction phenomenon. The hourly results indicates the effect of PCM as a thermal energy storage system in building envelopes for building's energy efficiency and thermal regulation. However, several problems need to be tackled before LHTES can reliably and practically be applied. We conclude with some suggestions for future work.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Latent heat thermal storage; PCM glazing system; Phase Change Materials; Thermally active surfaces; Thermal regulation; Architecture; Energy efficient buildings
Degree Name:
M.A.R.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith, Shane Ida
Committee Chair:
Smith, Shane Ida

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIntegration of Phase Change Materials in Commercial Buildings for Thermal Regulation and Energy Efficiencyen_US
dc.creatorMalekzadeh, Fatemehen
dc.contributor.authorMalekzadeh, Fatemehen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractOne of prospective procedures of absorbing thermal energy and releasing it during the required time is the application of phase change materials known as PCMs in building envelopes. High thermal energy storage (TES) materials has been a technology that effects the energy efficiency of a building by contributing in using onsite resources and reducing cooling or heating loads. Currently, many TES systems are emerging and contributing in building assemblies, however using an appropriate type of TES in a specific building and climate requires an in-depth knowledge of their properties. This research aims to provide a thorough review of a broad range of thermal energy storage technologies including their potential application in buildings. Subsequently, a comparative study and simulation between a basecase and an optimized model by PCM is thoroughly considered to understand the effect of high thermal storage building's shell on energy efficiency and indoor thermal comfort. Specifically this study proposes that the incorporation of PCM into glazing system as a high thermal capacity system will improve windows thermal performance and thermal capacity to varying climatic conditions. The generated results by eQUEST energy modeling software demonstrates approximately 25% reduction in cooling loads during the summer and 10% reduction in heating loads during the winter for optimized office building by PCM in hot arid climate of Arizona. Besides, using PCM in glazing system will reduce heat gain through the windows by conduction phenomenon. The hourly results indicates the effect of PCM as a thermal energy storage system in building envelopes for building's energy efficiency and thermal regulation. However, several problems need to be tackled before LHTES can reliably and practically be applied. We conclude with some suggestions for future work.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectLatent heat thermal storageen
dc.subjectPCM glazing systemen
dc.subjectPhase Change Materialsen
dc.subjectThermally active surfacesen
dc.subjectThermal regulationen
dc.subjectArchitectureen
dc.subjectEnergy efficient buildingsen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.R.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Shane Idaen
dc.contributor.chairSmith, Shane Idaen
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Shane Idaen
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfoun, Naderen
dc.contributor.committeememberMoeller, Colbyen
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