Environmental Natural Processes that Achieve Thermal Comfort in Multifamily Buildings in Hot Arid Regions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603491
Title:
Environmental Natural Processes that Achieve Thermal Comfort in Multifamily Buildings in Hot Arid Regions
Author:
Moreno, Paola
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Buildings, especially in hot climates, consume a lot of energy when people want to be comfortable inside them, which translates to very expensive fees each month. The most innovative response to this problem is renewable energy, that is used, in this case, to run mechanical HVAC systems. Renewable energy is the solution for many problems, but to avoid urban heat islands when using excessive HVAC systems (powered by renewables), and to solve thermal comfort-related problems, there has to be other solution. The major challenge to find it would be to have a change of thinking process. If a building in a hot-arid region uses natural processes to emulate the functions of HVAC systems, and the proper passive strategies, then, it will provide thermal comfort to its users, diminishing the need of a mechanical system. This hypothesis will be carried out by extracting the natural processes found in a specific case in nature, applying them into a building's design, and then simulating its energy efficiency with the adequate software. There will be a comparison of the same proposed building without the natural processes, to have tangible numbers showing that these proposed strategies, in fact, work. With explanatory detailed diagrams and the energy analysis, the hypothesis could be proven correct or incorrect. The significance of this approach relies on the proximity to the natural processes that have been working in different aspects of life since the beginning of time. They have been there all the time, waiting until architects, engineers, and people in general use them, instead of making more new energy-using inventions. By having the numbers from a conventional building and the ones of the proposed building, and the right environmental diagrams, the experiment should be valid. In the near future, there should be more research focused on nature and its processes, in order to be able to reduce the use of mechanical systems, and with that, reduce the energy use and the carbon footprint.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Energy efficiency; Natural processes; Passive systems; Termite mounds; Thermal Comfort; Architecture; Energy conservation
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chalfoun, Nader

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEnvironmental Natural Processes that Achieve Thermal Comfort in Multifamily Buildings in Hot Arid Regionsen_US
dc.creatorMoreno, Paolaen
dc.contributor.authorMoreno, Paolaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractBuildings, especially in hot climates, consume a lot of energy when people want to be comfortable inside them, which translates to very expensive fees each month. The most innovative response to this problem is renewable energy, that is used, in this case, to run mechanical HVAC systems. Renewable energy is the solution for many problems, but to avoid urban heat islands when using excessive HVAC systems (powered by renewables), and to solve thermal comfort-related problems, there has to be other solution. The major challenge to find it would be to have a change of thinking process. If a building in a hot-arid region uses natural processes to emulate the functions of HVAC systems, and the proper passive strategies, then, it will provide thermal comfort to its users, diminishing the need of a mechanical system. This hypothesis will be carried out by extracting the natural processes found in a specific case in nature, applying them into a building's design, and then simulating its energy efficiency with the adequate software. There will be a comparison of the same proposed building without the natural processes, to have tangible numbers showing that these proposed strategies, in fact, work. With explanatory detailed diagrams and the energy analysis, the hypothesis could be proven correct or incorrect. The significance of this approach relies on the proximity to the natural processes that have been working in different aspects of life since the beginning of time. They have been there all the time, waiting until architects, engineers, and people in general use them, instead of making more new energy-using inventions. By having the numbers from a conventional building and the ones of the proposed building, and the right environmental diagrams, the experiment should be valid. In the near future, there should be more research focused on nature and its processes, in order to be able to reduce the use of mechanical systems, and with that, reduce the energy use and the carbon footprint.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectEnergy efficiencyen
dc.subjectNatural processesen
dc.subjectPassive systemsen
dc.subjectTermite moundsen
dc.subjectThermal Comforten
dc.subjectArchitectureen
dc.subjectEnergy conservationen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorChalfoun, Naderen
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfoun, Naderen
dc.contributor.committeememberMoeller, Colby B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberYoussef, Omaren
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