Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/603463
Title:
Improving Daylight Illumination and Energy Efficiency Using an Atrium in a Mixed-Use Building
Author:
Godhamgaonkar, Anjali
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Commercial /mixed use buildings in which electric lighting consumes more than 40% of all electric energy demands are discovering a changing need for daylight under the impacts of energy costs. Using atrium in a design can provide adequate light levels into the core spaces. This research attempts to bring the interior daylighting illumination levels within a mixed used commercial -residential building in a desired range of comfortable intensity by using atrium in combination with other daylighting strategies. This research aims to achieve adequate daylight, along all the levels in the atrium and also achieve comfortable intensities in the surrounding spaces. A mixed use atrium building on a site in Tucson, Arizona, was designed and investigated for daylight which involved physical model (experimental) study and computer simulation using software Superlite. Problem areas in daylight performance of the design with respect to the desired daylight factors were identified and analyzed to optimize the daylight illuminance to a adequate level. The results reveal that for optimization, the changes in atrium roof geometry works best in combination with other daylight strategies such as window area, window sill height, light shelf, surface reflectance etc. Atrium in combination with other strategies is found to make significant contribution in daylighting the deeper spaces thereby reducing the use of artificial lighting energy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Chalfoun, Nader

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleImproving Daylight Illumination and Energy Efficiency Using an Atrium in a Mixed-Use Buildingen_US
dc.contributor.authorGodhamgaonkar, Anjalien
dc.date.issued2005en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.description.abstractCommercial /mixed use buildings in which electric lighting consumes more than 40% of all electric energy demands are discovering a changing need for daylight under the impacts of energy costs. Using atrium in a design can provide adequate light levels into the core spaces. This research attempts to bring the interior daylighting illumination levels within a mixed used commercial -residential building in a desired range of comfortable intensity by using atrium in combination with other daylighting strategies. This research aims to achieve adequate daylight, along all the levels in the atrium and also achieve comfortable intensities in the surrounding spaces. A mixed use atrium building on a site in Tucson, Arizona, was designed and investigated for daylight which involved physical model (experimental) study and computer simulation using software Superlite. Problem areas in daylight performance of the design with respect to the desired daylight factors were identified and analyzed to optimize the daylight illuminance to a adequate level. The results reveal that for optimization, the changes in atrium roof geometry works best in combination with other daylight strategies such as window area, window sill height, light shelf, surface reflectance etc. Atrium in combination with other strategies is found to make significant contribution in daylighting the deeper spaces thereby reducing the use of artificial lighting energy.en
dc.description.noteCollege of Architecture provided copy for digitization.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.chairChalfoun, Naderen
dc.contributor.committeememberHammann, Ralphen
dc.contributor.committeememberMedlin, Larryen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/603463en
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