Influential Environments: School Gardens Impacting Arizona Children's Environmental Perspectives

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595817
Title:
Influential Environments: School Gardens Impacting Arizona Children's Environmental Perspectives
Author:
Coe, Michelle Autumn
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Manzo Elementary is located in Barrio Hollywood, a low-income neighborhood of Tucson, Arizona. Despite the school's low testing scores and small enrollment, Manzo was recognized as the Best Green School in the nation for 2012 by the U.S. Green Building Council and continues to receive positive media attention. This is because Manzo is thriving in areas of experiential learning and ecological initiatives through the use of its school garden. The school has built sustainability into the core of its curriculum and physical environment, integrating chickens, composting piles, rainwater cisterns, and desert biomes within its courtyards, classrooms and playgrounds. Literature on school gardens suggests that gardens heighten children's sense of place, time spent in the environment, and perceptions of natural areas. However, there is a large gap in the literature which focuses on the use of school gardens as an environmental learning tool, and the ways in which it can appeal and connect children and community partnerships from the perspective of those children involved. The research presented here is an attempt to close that gap by bringing Manzo students into the conversation on school gardens and experiential learning. This study looks at how students perceive their environment, how they are learning and acquiring new environmental knowledge, how they share that knowledge, and the actions and behaviors—both individually and collaboratively—that ensue.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
environmental education; environmental perspectives; experiential learning; Manzo Elementary; school gardens; Geography; children's geography
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barron-Gafford, Greg; Liverman, Diana

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInfluential Environments: School Gardens Impacting Arizona Children's Environmental Perspectivesen_US
dc.creatorCoe, Michelle Autumnen
dc.contributor.authorCoe, Michelle Autumnen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractManzo Elementary is located in Barrio Hollywood, a low-income neighborhood of Tucson, Arizona. Despite the school's low testing scores and small enrollment, Manzo was recognized as the Best Green School in the nation for 2012 by the U.S. Green Building Council and continues to receive positive media attention. This is because Manzo is thriving in areas of experiential learning and ecological initiatives through the use of its school garden. The school has built sustainability into the core of its curriculum and physical environment, integrating chickens, composting piles, rainwater cisterns, and desert biomes within its courtyards, classrooms and playgrounds. Literature on school gardens suggests that gardens heighten children's sense of place, time spent in the environment, and perceptions of natural areas. However, there is a large gap in the literature which focuses on the use of school gardens as an environmental learning tool, and the ways in which it can appeal and connect children and community partnerships from the perspective of those children involved. The research presented here is an attempt to close that gap by bringing Manzo students into the conversation on school gardens and experiential learning. This study looks at how students perceive their environment, how they are learning and acquiring new environmental knowledge, how they share that knowledge, and the actions and behaviors—both individually and collaboratively—that ensue.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectenvironmental educationen
dc.subjectenvironmental perspectivesen
dc.subjectexperiential learningen
dc.subjectManzo Elementaryen
dc.subjectschool gardensen
dc.subjectGeographyen
dc.subjectchildren's geographyen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarron-Gafford, Gregen
dc.contributor.advisorLiverman, Dianaen
dc.contributor.committeememberBarron-Gafford, Gregen
dc.contributor.committeememberLiverman, Dianaen
dc.contributor.committeememberMarston, Sallieen
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