Results from the Prognostic Analysis Completed on the NASA EUVE Satellite to Measure Equipment Mission Life

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595790
Title:
Results from the Prognostic Analysis Completed on the NASA EUVE Satellite to Measure Equipment Mission Life
Author:
Losik, Len
Affiliation:
Failure Analysis
Issue Date:
2011-10
Rights:
Copyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
This paper addresses the research conducted at U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory, Center for Extreme Ultra Violet Astrophysics between 1994 and 1995 on the NASA EUVE ion-orbit satellite. It includes the results from conducting a scientific analysis called a prognostic analysis completed on all satellite subsystem equipment. A prognostic analysis uses equipment analog telemetry to measure equipment remaining usable life. The analysis relates equipment transient behavior, often referred to as "cannot duplicates" in a variety of industries caused from accelerated aging to the equipment end-of-life with certainty. The analysis was confirmed by using proprietary, pattern recognition software by Lockheed Martin personnel Lockheed Martin personnel completed an exploration into the application of statistical pattern recognition methods to identify the behavior caused from accelerated aging that experts in probability reliability analysis claims cannot exist. Both visual and statistical methods were successful in detecting suspect accelerated aging and this behavior was related to equipment end of life with certainty. The long-term objective of this research was to confirm that satellite subsystem equipment failures could be predicted so that satellite subsystem and payload engineering personnel could be allocated for only the time that equipment failures were predicted to occur, lowering the cost of mission operations. This research concluded that satellite subsystem equipment remaining usable life could be measured and equipment failures could be predicted with certainty so that engineering support for mission operations could be greatly reduced.
Keywords:
Telemetry; Measuring Remaining Usable Life; Calculating Remaining Usable Life; Measuring Mission Life; Telemetry Analysis; Diagnostic Analysis; Prognostic Analysis; Predictive Algorithms; Predicting Failures; Preventing Failures; Scientific Analysis; Engineering Analysis
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleResults from the Prognostic Analysis Completed on the NASA EUVE Satellite to Measure Equipment Mission Lifeen_US
dc.contributor.authorLosik, Lenen
dc.contributor.departmentFailure Analysisen
dc.date.issued2011-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses the research conducted at U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory, Center for Extreme Ultra Violet Astrophysics between 1994 and 1995 on the NASA EUVE ion-orbit satellite. It includes the results from conducting a scientific analysis called a prognostic analysis completed on all satellite subsystem equipment. A prognostic analysis uses equipment analog telemetry to measure equipment remaining usable life. The analysis relates equipment transient behavior, often referred to as "cannot duplicates" in a variety of industries caused from accelerated aging to the equipment end-of-life with certainty. The analysis was confirmed by using proprietary, pattern recognition software by Lockheed Martin personnel Lockheed Martin personnel completed an exploration into the application of statistical pattern recognition methods to identify the behavior caused from accelerated aging that experts in probability reliability analysis claims cannot exist. Both visual and statistical methods were successful in detecting suspect accelerated aging and this behavior was related to equipment end of life with certainty. The long-term objective of this research was to confirm that satellite subsystem equipment failures could be predicted so that satellite subsystem and payload engineering personnel could be allocated for only the time that equipment failures were predicted to occur, lowering the cost of mission operations. This research concluded that satellite subsystem equipment remaining usable life could be measured and equipment failures could be predicted with certainty so that engineering support for mission operations could be greatly reduced.en
dc.subjectTelemetryen
dc.subjectMeasuring Remaining Usable Lifeen
dc.subjectCalculating Remaining Usable Lifeen
dc.subjectMeasuring Mission Lifeen
dc.subjectTelemetry Analysisen
dc.subjectDiagnostic Analysisen
dc.subjectPrognostic Analysisen
dc.subjectPredictive Algorithmsen
dc.subjectPredicting Failuresen
dc.subjectPreventing Failuresen
dc.subjectScientific Analysisen
dc.subjectEngineering Analysisen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/595790en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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