Aggressive, Assertive and Non-confrontational Forms of Defending: Differentiation of Forms and Consequences of Defending

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595651
Title:
Aggressive, Assertive and Non-confrontational Forms of Defending: Differentiation of Forms and Consequences of Defending
Author:
Meter, Diana J.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The factor structure of the newly created Enacted Defending Scale (EDS) was investigated to better understand what strategies of defending children and adolescents enact to defend their peers from peer victimization. This investigation resulted in a 5-factor model, representative of assertive, overt aggressive, relationally aggressive, and two non-confrontational strategies of defending, telling an adult and comforting the victim. Aggressive forms of defending could be differentiated; whether the defending strategy was enacted in response to overt or relational victimization could not be differentiated. In general, aggressive strategies were associated with dependent variables indicative of poorer adjustment, while assertive and non-confrontational strategies were either related to positive dependent variables or unrelated to the psychosocial adjustment outcomes. Only one of the associations varied by age. The results suggest, first, that attention must be given to multiple forms of defending and that not all defending of peer victimization may have a prosocial effect, and second, that there is a need to carefully consider the potential consequences of defending for defenders themselves.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Bystander; Defending; Peer Victimization; Family & Consumer Sciences; Bullying
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family & Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Card, Noel A.; Russell, Stephen T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAggressive, Assertive and Non-confrontational Forms of Defending: Differentiation of Forms and Consequences of Defendingen_US
dc.creatorMeter, Diana J.en
dc.contributor.authorMeter, Diana J.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe factor structure of the newly created Enacted Defending Scale (EDS) was investigated to better understand what strategies of defending children and adolescents enact to defend their peers from peer victimization. This investigation resulted in a 5-factor model, representative of assertive, overt aggressive, relationally aggressive, and two non-confrontational strategies of defending, telling an adult and comforting the victim. Aggressive forms of defending could be differentiated; whether the defending strategy was enacted in response to overt or relational victimization could not be differentiated. In general, aggressive strategies were associated with dependent variables indicative of poorer adjustment, while assertive and non-confrontational strategies were either related to positive dependent variables or unrelated to the psychosocial adjustment outcomes. Only one of the associations varied by age. The results suggest, first, that attention must be given to multiple forms of defending and that not all defending of peer victimization may have a prosocial effect, and second, that there is a need to carefully consider the potential consequences of defending for defenders themselves.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectBystanderen
dc.subjectDefendingen
dc.subjectPeer Victimizationen
dc.subjectFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
dc.subjectBullyingen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily & Consumer Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCard, Noel A.en
dc.contributor.advisorRussell, Stephen T.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCard, Noel A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRussell, Stephen T.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBauman, Sherien
dc.contributor.committeememberSulkowski, Michael L.en
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