Characteristics of the School of British Bassoon Music of the Early and Mid-Twentieth Century, with Analysis of Representative Works

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595633
Title:
Characteristics of the School of British Bassoon Music of the Early and Mid-Twentieth Century, with Analysis of Representative Works
Author:
Van Klompenberg, Martin J.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Prior to 1851, music in Great Britain was influenced by the music of Germany, in particular by that of Johannes Brahms. This began to change, in part, because of the Great Exhibition of 1851, a forum held showing the best in raw materials, industrial design and new inventions, as well as the fine arts. This inspired new interest in English music and art. More importantly, this event led to the formation of the Royal College of Music, which opened in May of 1883. From this school an outpouring of distinctly English composers flowed, most of whom studied with Sir Charles Villiers Stanford. Among these were William Hurlstone, Thomas Dunhill, Gordon Jacob, and Ralph Vaughan Williams, each of whom wrote a piece for bassoon solo, bassoon and piano, or bassoon and orchestra. Jacob's student, Malcolm Arnold, added a solo bassoon composition of his own. These works are bound not only in their origin but in several common compositional traits. These traits include the use of quantities of phrasing within each section of a piece's form, melodies that strongly indicate a tonic key and use little rhythmic variation, the use of the bassoon's lowest range as the indicator of transitional material, and the change of role between the bassoon and the accompanimental voice in secondary themes.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Music
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dietz, William

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCharacteristics of the School of British Bassoon Music of the Early and Mid-Twentieth Century, with Analysis of Representative Worksen_US
dc.creatorVan Klompenberg, Martin J.en
dc.contributor.authorVan Klompenberg, Martin J.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPrior to 1851, music in Great Britain was influenced by the music of Germany, in particular by that of Johannes Brahms. This began to change, in part, because of the Great Exhibition of 1851, a forum held showing the best in raw materials, industrial design and new inventions, as well as the fine arts. This inspired new interest in English music and art. More importantly, this event led to the formation of the Royal College of Music, which opened in May of 1883. From this school an outpouring of distinctly English composers flowed, most of whom studied with Sir Charles Villiers Stanford. Among these were William Hurlstone, Thomas Dunhill, Gordon Jacob, and Ralph Vaughan Williams, each of whom wrote a piece for bassoon solo, bassoon and piano, or bassoon and orchestra. Jacob's student, Malcolm Arnold, added a solo bassoon composition of his own. These works are bound not only in their origin but in several common compositional traits. These traits include the use of quantities of phrasing within each section of a piece's form, melodies that strongly indicate a tonic key and use little rhythmic variation, the use of the bassoon's lowest range as the indicator of transitional material, and the change of role between the bassoon and the accompanimental voice in secondary themes.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMusicen
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorDietz, Williamen
dc.contributor.committeememberDietz, Williamen
dc.contributor.committeememberKatzen, Danielen
dc.contributor.committeememberKirkbride, Jerryen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.