Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595063
Title:
Corpus-based Transitivity Biases in People with Aphasia
Author:
DiLallo, Jennifer Nicole
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated whether people with aphasia (PWA) retain verb transitivity biases in expressive language. Transitivity, which represents a rudimentary division among simple sentence structures, is a fundamental language feature for our characterization of people with aphasia's (PWA) basic grammatical profile. However, no studies have yet detailed PWA's transitivity biases, given limited sample sizes of PWA (which especially restrict analyses of spontaneous speech). The current study analyzed 236 transcribed interviews of PWA from AphasiaBank and found that that PWA demonstrated identical transitive biases to controls. Further, PWA produced more intransitive verbs than transitive verbs overall. In ungrammatical productions, PWA's error rates were both higher in sentence structures that conflicted with verb bias and highest when an intransitive verb was attempted in a transitive structure. Thus, these findings indicate that PWA are sensitive to verb bias and verb complexity within expressive language. These effects are consistent with previous literature concerning PWA's sensitivity to verb bias in receptive tasks and to verb complexity in verb retrieval tasks.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
DeDe, Gayle

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCorpus-based Transitivity Biases in People with Aphasiaen_US
dc.creatorDiLallo, Jennifer Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorDiLallo, Jennifer Nicoleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated whether people with aphasia (PWA) retain verb transitivity biases in expressive language. Transitivity, which represents a rudimentary division among simple sentence structures, is a fundamental language feature for our characterization of people with aphasia's (PWA) basic grammatical profile. However, no studies have yet detailed PWA's transitivity biases, given limited sample sizes of PWA (which especially restrict analyses of spontaneous speech). The current study analyzed 236 transcribed interviews of PWA from AphasiaBank and found that that PWA demonstrated identical transitive biases to controls. Further, PWA produced more intransitive verbs than transitive verbs overall. In ungrammatical productions, PWA's error rates were both higher in sentence structures that conflicted with verb bias and highest when an intransitive verb was attempted in a transitive structure. Thus, these findings indicate that PWA are sensitive to verb bias and verb complexity within expressive language. These effects are consistent with previous literature concerning PWA's sensitivity to verb bias in receptive tasks and to verb complexity in verb retrieval tasks.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorDeDe, Gayleen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.