Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595057
Title:
Flipping the College Course: A Case Study
Author:
Westerband, Alexandra
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A Family Studies & Human Development (FSHD) 377 Adolescence course was flipped for the first time in the Spring 2015 semester with the goal of attaining better student learning experiences, learning outcomes, as well as peer dynamics. Flipping was done based on the Team-Based Learning approach. Seventy-nine students were enrolled. Assigned individual student work was completed outside of class. Students met in class, once a week, with their 3-4 person teams. Class generally followed this pattern: time for questions or mini lecture (when time allowed), individual post-test, group post-test, and an in-class activity. Other assignments included a group movie paper and weekly online discussion posts. The final section of the course featured guest lecturers focusing on psychosocial issues in adolescence. Students were surveyed at four times throughout the semester. In general, flipping seems to have included more perceived negatives than benefits. As expected, it was met with much student resistance. This included a lack of individual preparation, poor "student buy-in", and a great student preference for lecture. Student final course grades for Spring 2015 (flipped course) were higher, on average, than those of Spring 2014 (traditional lecture). The four questionnaires and coding of results are included in the appendices.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Family Studies and Human Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kelly, Maureen E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleFlipping the College Course: A Case Studyen_US
dc.creatorWesterband, Alexandraen
dc.contributor.authorWesterband, Alexandraen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractA Family Studies & Human Development (FSHD) 377 Adolescence course was flipped for the first time in the Spring 2015 semester with the goal of attaining better student learning experiences, learning outcomes, as well as peer dynamics. Flipping was done based on the Team-Based Learning approach. Seventy-nine students were enrolled. Assigned individual student work was completed outside of class. Students met in class, once a week, with their 3-4 person teams. Class generally followed this pattern: time for questions or mini lecture (when time allowed), individual post-test, group post-test, and an in-class activity. Other assignments included a group movie paper and weekly online discussion posts. The final section of the course featured guest lecturers focusing on psychosocial issues in adolescence. Students were surveyed at four times throughout the semester. In general, flipping seems to have included more perceived negatives than benefits. As expected, it was met with much student resistance. This included a lack of individual preparation, poor "student buy-in", and a great student preference for lecture. Student final course grades for Spring 2015 (flipped course) were higher, on average, than those of Spring 2014 (traditional lecture). The four questionnaires and coding of results are included in the appendices.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily Studies and Human Developmenten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKelly, Maureen E.en
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