Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595054
Title:
The Case for Campaign Finance Reform in the United States
Author:
Sheridan, Michael Dale
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Campaign finance laws in the United States have changed dramatically over the last thirty years. These changes are largely due to laws passed by Congress and decisions from the Supreme Court. Two major laws that determined the course of the laws were the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. These laws outline how campaigns were required to run. In addition to laws passed by Congress, decisions from the Supreme Court have dramatically changed the scope of electioneering. Buckley v Valeo, decided in 1976, and Citizens United v FEC, decided in 2010, both brought major changes to elections, ranging from disclosure requirements to the creation of SuperPACs. These decisions, paired with the laws passed by Congress set the stage for a campaigning system that many see as in dire need of reform.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Palmer, Elizabeth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Case for Campaign Finance Reform in the United Statesen_US
dc.creatorSheridan, Michael Daleen
dc.contributor.authorSheridan, Michael Daleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractCampaign finance laws in the United States have changed dramatically over the last thirty years. These changes are largely due to laws passed by Congress and decisions from the Supreme Court. Two major laws that determined the course of the laws were the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, and the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002. These laws outline how campaigns were required to run. In addition to laws passed by Congress, decisions from the Supreme Court have dramatically changed the scope of electioneering. Buckley v Valeo, decided in 1976, and Citizens United v FEC, decided in 2010, both brought major changes to elections, ranging from disclosure requirements to the creation of SuperPACs. These decisions, paired with the laws passed by Congress set the stage for a campaigning system that many see as in dire need of reform.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPalmer, Elizabethen
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