Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/595033
Title:
Contraception and Induced Abortion as Minority Health Disparities
Author:
Goble, Kyle David
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With an unintended pregnancy rate of over 50% in the United States and with 40% of those unintended pregnancies being terminated via an induced abortion, it is easy to see that abortion is an important medical procedure with numerous social and political implications for both women and men. In addition, public health research has consistently shown persistent minority health disparities with respect to abortion utilization, contraception use, and unintended pregnancy rates in women of color in the United States. It is impossible to talk about abortion use without talking about contraceptive use. They are inseparable entities in the realm of understanding of why women seek out abortions. Knowledge of the current state of abortion and contraception access in the United States is critical to health providers and women if the goal is to decrease the rate of unintended pregnancy, and minority health disparities are an integral part of that goal. A basic understanding of the physiology underlying contraception, therefore, can help to inform opinions, and better evidence-based and less polarized, violent debate between the pro-life and pro-choice sides can better inform policy and access surrounding this important issue.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Weinstein, Randi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleContraception and Induced Abortion as Minority Health Disparitiesen_US
dc.creatorGoble, Kyle Daviden
dc.contributor.authorGoble, Kyle Daviden
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWith an unintended pregnancy rate of over 50% in the United States and with 40% of those unintended pregnancies being terminated via an induced abortion, it is easy to see that abortion is an important medical procedure with numerous social and political implications for both women and men. In addition, public health research has consistently shown persistent minority health disparities with respect to abortion utilization, contraception use, and unintended pregnancy rates in women of color in the United States. It is impossible to talk about abortion use without talking about contraceptive use. They are inseparable entities in the realm of understanding of why women seek out abortions. Knowledge of the current state of abortion and contraception access in the United States is critical to health providers and women if the goal is to decrease the rate of unintended pregnancy, and minority health disparities are an integral part of that goal. A basic understanding of the physiology underlying contraception, therefore, can help to inform opinions, and better evidence-based and less polarized, violent debate between the pro-life and pro-choice sides can better inform policy and access surrounding this important issue.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWeinstein, Randien
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