Using Homology-Based Methods and Functional Similarity to Identify Antibiotic Resistance in a Natural Environment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594942
Title:
Using Homology-Based Methods and Functional Similarity to Identify Antibiotic Resistance in a Natural Environment
Author:
Diaz, Krystalle Sharlyn
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Antibiotics are the crux of modern medicine, and antibiotic resistance (AbR) is a challenge to overcome. It has long been known that antibiotic production by soil microbiota is a natural process. Antibiotics such as streptomycin and penicillin come from common soil microorganisms. AbR is said to spread readily and rapidly through the environment, but its natural occurrence is poorly constrained. In studies analyzing natural AbR across a variety of habitats, researchers have found resistance in agricultural fields, human and animal feces, soils, deep caves, prehistoric ice cores, marine habitats, and reclaimed wastewater. Permafrost soils represent a pristine (human-unimpacted) environment capable of serving as a model system for natural AbR. I compared a functionality-based approach to a traditional identity-based approach to identify AbR sequences in permafrost microbial community genomes. The functionality-based approach yielded better quality results overall, and identified sequences more likely to be mappable to molecular pathways with the KEGG database.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.E.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McLain, Jean

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUsing Homology-Based Methods and Functional Similarity to Identify Antibiotic Resistance in a Natural Environmenten_US
dc.creatorDiaz, Krystalle Sharlynen
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, Krystalle Sharlynen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractAntibiotics are the crux of modern medicine, and antibiotic resistance (AbR) is a challenge to overcome. It has long been known that antibiotic production by soil microbiota is a natural process. Antibiotics such as streptomycin and penicillin come from common soil microorganisms. AbR is said to spread readily and rapidly through the environment, but its natural occurrence is poorly constrained. In studies analyzing natural AbR across a variety of habitats, researchers have found resistance in agricultural fields, human and animal feces, soils, deep caves, prehistoric ice cores, marine habitats, and reclaimed wastewater. Permafrost soils represent a pristine (human-unimpacted) environment capable of serving as a model system for natural AbR. I compared a functionality-based approach to a traditional identity-based approach to identify AbR sequences in permafrost microbial community genomes. The functionality-based approach yielded better quality results overall, and identified sequences more likely to be mappable to molecular pathways with the KEGG database.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.E.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMcLain, Jeanen
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