Regional Planning Solutions to Changing the Culture of Water Consumption in Phoenix, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594938
Title:
Regional Planning Solutions to Changing the Culture of Water Consumption in Phoenix, Arizona
Author:
Clark, Janine Genevieve
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Arizona has put time and effort into drought preparation—with water banking, surface water storage, and laws to dictate water planning for future developments. However, these securities are stretched thin and weakened by the wake of Arizona's rapid development. In this paper I will focus on the state catalyst for growth, and precedent for political decisions: Phoenix. With a political-economic foundation rooted in a culture of consumption, Phoenix has enabled boundless growth within its impermanent borders—gaining population and short-term economic benefits, while losing its unique desert identity. If adjustments are not made to current means of allocation and rates of demand, Phoenix will face a supply gap in the future. These issues are compounded by climate change, which threatens the longevity of surface water supplies. This paper will outline the strengths and highlight the shortfalls of previous water policies and projects, then discuss threats to available supplies. Embodying a desert identity and embracing conservation in both the urbanized area and economy will be key to the future success of Phoenix, as the necessary changes in policies that link water and land use planning will not be possible without an engaged public base.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Urban and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bauer, Carl J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRegional Planning Solutions to Changing the Culture of Water Consumption in Phoenix, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorClark, Janine Genevieveen
dc.contributor.authorClark, Janine Genevieveen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractArizona has put time and effort into drought preparation—with water banking, surface water storage, and laws to dictate water planning for future developments. However, these securities are stretched thin and weakened by the wake of Arizona's rapid development. In this paper I will focus on the state catalyst for growth, and precedent for political decisions: Phoenix. With a political-economic foundation rooted in a culture of consumption, Phoenix has enabled boundless growth within its impermanent borders—gaining population and short-term economic benefits, while losing its unique desert identity. If adjustments are not made to current means of allocation and rates of demand, Phoenix will face a supply gap in the future. These issues are compounded by climate change, which threatens the longevity of surface water supplies. This paper will outline the strengths and highlight the shortfalls of previous water policies and projects, then discuss threats to available supplies. Embodying a desert identity and embracing conservation in both the urbanized area and economy will be key to the future success of Phoenix, as the necessary changes in policies that link water and land use planning will not be possible without an engaged public base.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineUrban and Regional Developmenten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBauer, Carl J.en
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