Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594558
Title:
Recent Infectious Disease Mortality Trends in the United States
Author:
Hansen, Victoria Lee
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Importance: Infectious diseases present an ever-changing threat to public health. Analysis of pathogen-linked mortality trends is elucidatory to infectious disease burden. Objective: To describe major shifts in United States infectious disease mortality trends from 1900-2013 with emphasis on recent changes for1980-2013. Design: Ecological study of infectious disease mortality in the United States. Setting: Infectious disease deaths were summed from Vital Statistic Reports from 1900-1967. Infectious disease deaths from 1968-2013 were extracted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wonder database and tallied. Participants: Deaths among United States residents from 1900-2013. Main Outcome Measures: Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates for key infectious diseases including emerging infections, specifically human immunodeficiency virus and certain vector-borne diseases, re-emerging diseases, specifically, vaccine-preventable diseases and pathogens with drug-resistant strains, and newly defined infectious diseases such as cervical cancer due to human papilloma virus. Results: While human immunodeficiency virus mortality has been declining since 1995 (average annual percent change = 10.6%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [-13.1, -7.9]), recent years have seen an increase in infectious disease mortality related to vector-borne diseases. Specifically, with the emergence of West Nile virus in the United States, vector-borne disease mortality increased from 34.5 deaths per year (1980-2001) to 141.7 deaths per year (2002-2013). Vaccine preventable disease mortality continues to decrease with an average annual percent change of 2.4%, 95% CI [-2.8, -2.0] from 1980-2013. Mortality due to drug-resistant strains of infectious diseases is increasing at an average annual percent change of 0.8%, 95% CI [0.1, 1.6] from 1980-2013. Finally, mortality due to a disease previously not classified as infectious, cervical cancer, has been decreasing at an average annual percent change of 1.4%, 95% CI [-1.7, -1.1] since 1980. Conclusions: Despite the overall downward trends in infectious disease mortality, they still account for 43 per 100,000 deaths annually in the United States. Specific diseases and disease groups evaluated in this study show inconsistent, but concerning, trends across emerging, re-emerging, and newly defined infectious diseases, indicating that infectious diseases remain a public health concern.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
infectious; mortality; states; trends; united; Epidemiology; disease
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Epidemiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brown, Heidi E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRecent Infectious Disease Mortality Trends in the United Statesen_US
dc.creatorHansen, Victoria Leeen
dc.contributor.authorHansen, Victoria Leeen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractImportance: Infectious diseases present an ever-changing threat to public health. Analysis of pathogen-linked mortality trends is elucidatory to infectious disease burden. Objective: To describe major shifts in United States infectious disease mortality trends from 1900-2013 with emphasis on recent changes for1980-2013. Design: Ecological study of infectious disease mortality in the United States. Setting: Infectious disease deaths were summed from Vital Statistic Reports from 1900-1967. Infectious disease deaths from 1968-2013 were extracted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wonder database and tallied. Participants: Deaths among United States residents from 1900-2013. Main Outcome Measures: Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates for key infectious diseases including emerging infections, specifically human immunodeficiency virus and certain vector-borne diseases, re-emerging diseases, specifically, vaccine-preventable diseases and pathogens with drug-resistant strains, and newly defined infectious diseases such as cervical cancer due to human papilloma virus. Results: While human immunodeficiency virus mortality has been declining since 1995 (average annual percent change = 10.6%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [-13.1, -7.9]), recent years have seen an increase in infectious disease mortality related to vector-borne diseases. Specifically, with the emergence of West Nile virus in the United States, vector-borne disease mortality increased from 34.5 deaths per year (1980-2001) to 141.7 deaths per year (2002-2013). Vaccine preventable disease mortality continues to decrease with an average annual percent change of 2.4%, 95% CI [-2.8, -2.0] from 1980-2013. Mortality due to drug-resistant strains of infectious diseases is increasing at an average annual percent change of 0.8%, 95% CI [0.1, 1.6] from 1980-2013. Finally, mortality due to a disease previously not classified as infectious, cervical cancer, has been decreasing at an average annual percent change of 1.4%, 95% CI [-1.7, -1.1] since 1980. Conclusions: Despite the overall downward trends in infectious disease mortality, they still account for 43 per 100,000 deaths annually in the United States. Specific diseases and disease groups evaluated in this study show inconsistent, but concerning, trends across emerging, re-emerging, and newly defined infectious diseases, indicating that infectious diseases remain a public health concern.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectinfectiousen
dc.subjectmortalityen
dc.subjectstatesen
dc.subjecttrendsen
dc.subjectuniteden
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectdiseaseen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Heidi E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, Heidi E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDennis, Leslie K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberOren, Eyalen
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