An Ethnography: Burmese Refugees and Latent Tuberculosis Infection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594542
Title:
An Ethnography: Burmese Refugees and Latent Tuberculosis Infection
Author:
Williams, Deborah K.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In 2013 Burma, the country of origin for many refugees of whom have resettled in the U.S. was in the top three countries for notification of suspected Latent Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI). Approximately 5%-10% of individuals diagnosed with LTBI are at risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) disease; the highest risk occurs within two years following the diagnosis. Burmese refugees face a high potential of developing LTBI during resettlement in the U.S. and are at high risk for subsequent TB. Currently, we have limited knowledge of the Burmese Chin refugees' explanatory model (EM) of LTBI. Understanding the EM of these refugees is important because one's EM facilitates the recognition and response to illness, including early diagnosis and treatment. In the context of LTBI, this relates to the potential prevention of active TB disease. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to discover the Burmese Chin refugees' EM of LTBI and to describe the barriers experienced in receiving LTBI treatment. Kleinman's EM provided a conceptual framework to guide this study. A Burmese refugee gatekeeper assisted with community immersion and participant recruitment. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to recruit participants. Data were collected through participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Three data analysis strategies for ethnography that were used included domain, taxonomic, and componential analyses. Domain analysis began after open, inductive coding of the data. Data saturation was reached and the research questions were answered with eight participants. Data from 15 key informant interviews were abstracted into three domains: EM of LTBI, Fear and Stigmatization, and Barriers to Receiving LTBI Treatment. The over-arching theme, LTBI: My Shadowbox was derived from these three domains, 11 categories, and 25 subcategories through iterative and inductive data analysis. The analysis revealed the participants' language, behavior patterns, beliefs, values and health seeking experiences of LTBI in the U.S. The findings from this study will help to inform culturally tailored interventions to reduce LTBI and TB health disparities among Burmese Chin refugees and potentially other Burmese refugee subgroups in the U.S. Knowledge of the Burmese Chin refugees' EM of LTBI can inform health policy for reducing LTBI treatment barriers.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Kleinman's explanatory model; latent tuberculosis; public health; refugee; tuberculosis; Nursing; health disparities
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McEwen, Marylyn Morris
Committee Chair:
McEwen, Marylyn Morris

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAn Ethnography: Burmese Refugees and Latent Tuberculosis Infectionen_US
dc.creatorWilliams, Deborah K.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Deborah K.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn 2013 Burma, the country of origin for many refugees of whom have resettled in the U.S. was in the top three countries for notification of suspected Latent Tuberculosis Infection (LTBI). Approximately 5%-10% of individuals diagnosed with LTBI are at risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) disease; the highest risk occurs within two years following the diagnosis. Burmese refugees face a high potential of developing LTBI during resettlement in the U.S. and are at high risk for subsequent TB. Currently, we have limited knowledge of the Burmese Chin refugees' explanatory model (EM) of LTBI. Understanding the EM of these refugees is important because one's EM facilitates the recognition and response to illness, including early diagnosis and treatment. In the context of LTBI, this relates to the potential prevention of active TB disease. The purpose of this ethnographic study was to discover the Burmese Chin refugees' EM of LTBI and to describe the barriers experienced in receiving LTBI treatment. Kleinman's EM provided a conceptual framework to guide this study. A Burmese refugee gatekeeper assisted with community immersion and participant recruitment. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to recruit participants. Data were collected through participant observation and semi-structured interviews. Three data analysis strategies for ethnography that were used included domain, taxonomic, and componential analyses. Domain analysis began after open, inductive coding of the data. Data saturation was reached and the research questions were answered with eight participants. Data from 15 key informant interviews were abstracted into three domains: EM of LTBI, Fear and Stigmatization, and Barriers to Receiving LTBI Treatment. The over-arching theme, LTBI: My Shadowbox was derived from these three domains, 11 categories, and 25 subcategories through iterative and inductive data analysis. The analysis revealed the participants' language, behavior patterns, beliefs, values and health seeking experiences of LTBI in the U.S. The findings from this study will help to inform culturally tailored interventions to reduce LTBI and TB health disparities among Burmese Chin refugees and potentially other Burmese refugee subgroups in the U.S. Knowledge of the Burmese Chin refugees' EM of LTBI can inform health policy for reducing LTBI treatment barriers.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectKleinman's explanatory modelen
dc.subjectlatent tuberculosisen
dc.subjectpublic healthen
dc.subjectrefugeeen
dc.subjecttuberculosisen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjecthealth disparitiesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwen, Marylyn Morrisen
dc.contributor.chairMcEwen, Marylyn Morrisen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcEwen, Marylyn Morrisen
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberLoescher, Lois J.en
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