Enduring Trails: An Internship with the Jicarilla Apache Tribal Historic Preservation Office

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594398
Title:
Enduring Trails: An Internship with the Jicarilla Apache Tribal Historic Preservation Office
Author:
O'Meara, Sean Michael
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The graduate internship and thesis option in American Indian Studies affords students a unique opportunity to directly apply their academic interests in a manner that address the contemporary needs of a Native nation. By engaging with tribes in this manner, students are assured that their academic efforts actively and positively contribute to ongoing and relevant tribal projects or programs, while the nation is assured that research concerning their community is being informed by a working experience with their community. This thesis documents my internship with the Jicarilla Apache Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Office in which I assisted the office in conducting oral history interviews and compiling a report for their project entitled: Rediscovering Trail Roots and Routes: The Jicarilla Apache and the Old Spanish National Historic Trail.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
American Indian Studies
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Colombi, Benedict J.
Committee Chair:
Colombi, Benedict J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEnduring Trails: An Internship with the Jicarilla Apache Tribal Historic Preservation Officeen_US
dc.creatorO'Meara, Sean Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorO'Meara, Sean Michaelen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe graduate internship and thesis option in American Indian Studies affords students a unique opportunity to directly apply their academic interests in a manner that address the contemporary needs of a Native nation. By engaging with tribes in this manner, students are assured that their academic efforts actively and positively contribute to ongoing and relevant tribal projects or programs, while the nation is assured that research concerning their community is being informed by a working experience with their community. This thesis documents my internship with the Jicarilla Apache Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Office in which I assisted the office in conducting oral history interviews and compiling a report for their project entitled: Rediscovering Trail Roots and Routes: The Jicarilla Apache and the Old Spanish National Historic Trail.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectAmerican Indian Studiesen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorColombi, Benedict J.en
dc.contributor.chairColombi, Benedict J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberColombi, Benedict J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBlythe, Jeffery W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFerguson, T.J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTrosper, Ronald L.en
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