Homoafectividad y Nueva Izquierda en América Latina: Adaptaciones de la Obra de Senel Paz

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594377
Title:
Homoafectividad y Nueva Izquierda en América Latina: Adaptaciones de la Obra de Senel Paz
Author:
Gutiérrez Coto, Amauri Francisco
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Dissertation not available (per author's request)
Abstract:
Social Science scholars study how the New Left - the wave of leftist governments in Latin America since 1999 - redefines leftism in the Post-Cold War. Part of this redefinition is a new social pact between the Queer community and those Latin American governments. Chapter 1 traces the ideological itinerary of this new social agreement and establishes the methodology of the study. El lobo, el bosque y el hombre nuevo (The Wolf, the Forest and the New Man) by Senel Paz reformulated the relationship between the dissident subjects of the patriarchy and the leftist state in Cuban society of the 1990s. Chapter 2 highlights Paz's text for its separation from the Cold War narratives centered on the leftist armed insurgent movements. Chapter 3 studies how the film adaptation of Paz's work globalized the argument and structured it within the Post-Cold War. Chapter 4 analyzes the theatrical adaptations of Paz's work made in Latin American countries after 1999. Two are compared from countries with New Latin American Leftist governments, Venezuela and Argentina, with others made in non-Latin American countries, the United States and Spain. The critical reception of the two theatrical adaptations done in Latin America showed the argument as part of their reality, in contrast to the representations made in the United States and Spain. Chapter 5 analyzes the repercussions of Paz's text in popular culture through the reggaeton "Fresa y chocolate."
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Digital Humanities; Film Studies; New Latin American Left; Pink Tide; Theatre; Spanish; Adaptation Studies
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Spanish
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fitch, Melissa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHomoafectividad y Nueva Izquierda en América Latina: Adaptaciones de la Obra de Senel Pazen_US
dc.creatorGutiérrez Coto, Amauri Franciscoen
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez Coto, Amauri Franciscoen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseDissertation not available (per author's request)-
dc.description.abstractSocial Science scholars study how the New Left - the wave of leftist governments in Latin America since 1999 - redefines leftism in the Post-Cold War. Part of this redefinition is a new social pact between the Queer community and those Latin American governments. Chapter 1 traces the ideological itinerary of this new social agreement and establishes the methodology of the study. El lobo, el bosque y el hombre nuevo (The Wolf, the Forest and the New Man) by Senel Paz reformulated the relationship between the dissident subjects of the patriarchy and the leftist state in Cuban society of the 1990s. Chapter 2 highlights Paz's text for its separation from the Cold War narratives centered on the leftist armed insurgent movements. Chapter 3 studies how the film adaptation of Paz's work globalized the argument and structured it within the Post-Cold War. Chapter 4 analyzes the theatrical adaptations of Paz's work made in Latin American countries after 1999. Two are compared from countries with New Latin American Leftist governments, Venezuela and Argentina, with others made in non-Latin American countries, the United States and Spain. The critical reception of the two theatrical adaptations done in Latin America showed the argument as part of their reality, in contrast to the representations made in the United States and Spain. Chapter 5 analyzes the repercussions of Paz's text in popular culture through the reggaeton "Fresa y chocolate."en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectDigital Humanitiesen
dc.subjectFilm Studiesen
dc.subjectNew Latin American Leften
dc.subjectPink Tideen
dc.subjectTheatreen
dc.subjectSpanishen
dc.subjectAdaptation Studiesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFitch, Melissaen
dc.contributor.committeememberFitch, Melissaen
dc.contributor.committeememberFoster, David W.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKinkade, Richard P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMahler, Anne Garlanden
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