Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/594367
Title:
Non-Null Interferometer for Testing of Aspheric Surfaces
Author:
Sullivan, John Joseph
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of aspheric surfaces in optical designs can allow for improved performance with fewer optical elements. Their use has become common place due to advancements in optical manufacturing technologies. Standard interferometric testing of aspheric surfaces makes use of part specific null optics in order to match the test wavefront to the aspheric surface under test. Non-null interferometric testing offers the possibility to test a range of aspheric surfaces with a single interferometer design without the need for part specific null optics. However, non-null tests can generate interferograms with very high fringe frequencies that must be resolved and unwrapped, wavefronts with large slopes that must be imaged without vignetting, and induced aberrations which must be separated from the surface errors of the part. The main goal of this project was the construction of a non-null interferometer capable of testing the aspheric tooling used in the manufacturing of soft contact lenses. Sub-Nyquist interferometry was used to allow for large wavefront departures which generate high fringe frequency interferograms to be both captured and unwrapped. The sparse array sensor at the heart of the Sub-Nyquist technique sets limits on both the range of the parts to be tested and the design of the interferometer. Characterization of the interferometer was achieved through the reverse optimization and reverse ray tracing of a model of the interferometer and was aided by multiple measurements of the test part at shifted positions. The system was found to be capable of measuring parts with aspheric departure of over 60λ from the best fit sphere, which with introduced part shifts, generated over 300λ of OPD at the detector. The OPD introduced by the parts was measured to an accuracy of at least 0.76λ peak to valley and 0.12λ rms.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Optical Sciences
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Greivenkamp, John E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNon-Null Interferometer for Testing of Aspheric Surfacesen_US
dc.creatorSullivan, John Josephen
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, John Josephen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe use of aspheric surfaces in optical designs can allow for improved performance with fewer optical elements. Their use has become common place due to advancements in optical manufacturing technologies. Standard interferometric testing of aspheric surfaces makes use of part specific null optics in order to match the test wavefront to the aspheric surface under test. Non-null interferometric testing offers the possibility to test a range of aspheric surfaces with a single interferometer design without the need for part specific null optics. However, non-null tests can generate interferograms with very high fringe frequencies that must be resolved and unwrapped, wavefronts with large slopes that must be imaged without vignetting, and induced aberrations which must be separated from the surface errors of the part. The main goal of this project was the construction of a non-null interferometer capable of testing the aspheric tooling used in the manufacturing of soft contact lenses. Sub-Nyquist interferometry was used to allow for large wavefront departures which generate high fringe frequency interferograms to be both captured and unwrapped. The sparse array sensor at the heart of the Sub-Nyquist technique sets limits on both the range of the parts to be tested and the design of the interferometer. Characterization of the interferometer was achieved through the reverse optimization and reverse ray tracing of a model of the interferometer and was aided by multiple measurements of the test part at shifted positions. The system was found to be capable of measuring parts with aspheric departure of over 60λ from the best fit sphere, which with introduced part shifts, generated over 300λ of OPD at the detector. The OPD introduced by the parts was measured to an accuracy of at least 0.76λ peak to valley and 0.12λ rms.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGreivenkamp, John E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGreivenkamp, John E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSasián, Joséen
dc.contributor.committeememberWyant, James C.en
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