Preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Assessment of Advanced Practice Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Current Practices

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/593629
Title:
Preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Assessment of Advanced Practice Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Current Practices
Author:
Nguyen, Tracy Thuy
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Background: In the United States, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in children less than one year old, and the third leading case of death in infants. In 1992, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended to place infants supine for sleep, and the SIDS rate declined by 50%. Despite these efforts, the SIDS rate has plateaued since 2001. With the growing number of advanced practices nurses (APN) providing care to pregnant women and infants, APNs are in a position to educate new parents on preventing SIDS using the 2011 AAP safe sleep recommendations. Yet, knowledge, attitudes, and current practices of APNs regarding SIDS risk reduction are unknown in the State of Arizona. Purpose: The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project was to assess the attitudes, knowledge, and current practices of APNs regarding risk reduction strategies. Methods: This study was a descriptive quantitative cross-sectional survey design. Target study participants included APNs that provided care to pregnant women and/or infants up to 12 months old. The study was conducted in the State of Arizona through online surveys using the Qualtrics software. The study participants' knowledge, attitudes, and current practices were assessed using an adapted validated survey tool that included multiple choice items and responses using Likert scales. Results: Twenty-three APNs completed the survey. Knowledge about SIDs was average, with a mean score of 74% correct. Although most APNs felt it was important to educate parents about SIDS, only three-quarters of APNs provided verbal education to parents, and less than half of participants provided written information to parents. To decrease the SIDS rate, it is necessary for APNs to gain more knowledge about current safe sleep recommendations.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome; Nursing; SIDS
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gephart, Sheila M.
Committee Chair:
Gephart, Sheila M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePreventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Assessment of Advanced Practice Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Current Practicesen_US
dc.creatorNguyen, Tracy Thuyen
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Tracy Thuyen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: In the United States, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in children less than one year old, and the third leading case of death in infants. In 1992, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended to place infants supine for sleep, and the SIDS rate declined by 50%. Despite these efforts, the SIDS rate has plateaued since 2001. With the growing number of advanced practices nurses (APN) providing care to pregnant women and infants, APNs are in a position to educate new parents on preventing SIDS using the 2011 AAP safe sleep recommendations. Yet, knowledge, attitudes, and current practices of APNs regarding SIDS risk reduction are unknown in the State of Arizona. Purpose: The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project was to assess the attitudes, knowledge, and current practices of APNs regarding risk reduction strategies. Methods: This study was a descriptive quantitative cross-sectional survey design. Target study participants included APNs that provided care to pregnant women and/or infants up to 12 months old. The study was conducted in the State of Arizona through online surveys using the Qualtrics software. The study participants' knowledge, attitudes, and current practices were assessed using an adapted validated survey tool that included multiple choice items and responses using Likert scales. Results: Twenty-three APNs completed the survey. Knowledge about SIDs was average, with a mean score of 74% correct. Although most APNs felt it was important to educate parents about SIDS, only three-quarters of APNs provided verbal education to parents, and less than half of participants provided written information to parents. To decrease the SIDS rate, it is necessary for APNs to gain more knowledge about current safe sleep recommendations.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectSudden Infant Death Syndromeen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectSIDSen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGephart, Sheila M.en
dc.contributor.chairGephart, Sheila M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGephart, Sheila M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldsmith, Melissa M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPacheco, Christy L.en
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