"Too White to be Black and Too Black to be White": The Consequences of a Color-blind Orientation on Black/White Biracial Students' College Choice Process and Racial Identity Development

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/593465
Title:
"Too White to be Black and Too Black to be White": The Consequences of a Color-blind Orientation on Black/White Biracial Students' College Choice Process and Racial Identity Development
Author:
Miner, Danielle D.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This qualitative study examined how the racial identity of Black/White biracial college students shaped their college choice process, and the extent to which these students explored their racial identity at the University of Arizona. Sixteen self-identified Black/White biracial students were interviewed to learn what factors they considered during their college choice process. Additionally, these students were interviewed to understand how the context of this particular institution facilitated or hindered their racial identity exploration. This study found that Black/White biracial students approached their college choice process from a color-blind orientation which had unintended consequences on how these students explored and understood their racial identity in the context of a PWI. The predominantly White precollege contexts these students came from decentralized their racial identity early on; however, on campus Black/White biracial students were continuously confronted with messages that placed an emphasis on race. Implications for student services and for addressing the needs of Black/White biracial students are presented.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Black/White biracial; college choice; color-blind; racial identity development; Higher Education; biracial
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Milem, Jeffrey F.; Cabrera, Nolan L.
Committee Chair:
Milem, Jeffrey F.; Cabrera, Nolan L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.title"Too White to be Black and Too Black to be White": The Consequences of a Color-blind Orientation on Black/White Biracial Students' College Choice Process and Racial Identity Developmenten_US
dc.creatorMiner, Danielle D.en
dc.contributor.authorMiner, Danielle D.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis qualitative study examined how the racial identity of Black/White biracial college students shaped their college choice process, and the extent to which these students explored their racial identity at the University of Arizona. Sixteen self-identified Black/White biracial students were interviewed to learn what factors they considered during their college choice process. Additionally, these students were interviewed to understand how the context of this particular institution facilitated or hindered their racial identity exploration. This study found that Black/White biracial students approached their college choice process from a color-blind orientation which had unintended consequences on how these students explored and understood their racial identity in the context of a PWI. The predominantly White precollege contexts these students came from decentralized their racial identity early on; however, on campus Black/White biracial students were continuously confronted with messages that placed an emphasis on race. Implications for student services and for addressing the needs of Black/White biracial students are presented.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectBlack/White biracialen
dc.subjectcollege choiceen
dc.subjectcolor-blinden
dc.subjectracial identity developmenten
dc.subjectHigher Educationen
dc.subjectbiracialen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMilem, Jeffrey F.en
dc.contributor.advisorCabrera, Nolan L.en
dc.contributor.chairMilem, Jeffrey F.en
dc.contributor.chairCabrera, Nolan L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMilem, Jeffrey F.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCabrera, Nolan L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDeil-Amen, Reginaen
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