Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/584147
Title:
Sustainability and Affordability: How Single-Family Home Retrofits Can Achieve Both
Author:
Goff, Jason
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Climate change and resource availability are arguably the two biggest challenges humanity faces going forward. An unprecedented body of scientific work has been compiled over the past thirty years that indicates humans have and continue to be the largest driver of these environmental concerns, and therefore must also be responsible for any solutions. Buildings and their construction account for nearly 40% of the total energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Water consumption by both buildings and thermoelectric power generation is also an issue, especially in the Southwest and Western United States. Green building has been gaining steam in the U.S. for the past two decades, but the primary focus has been in the commercial and industrial sectors. The residential markets have not seen the efficiency gains, primarily due to the perception that the cost isn’t worth the benefit. This project examines the need, feasibility, and potential benefits of sustainably retrofitting existing homes as an alternative to new construction. It provides a broad definition of sustainability and then focuses into a more narrow description of its application within the built environment. Using precedents, 3D modeling, and energy simulation software it compares the energy and water savings of a retrofit versus a base case as well as the performance of the average Southern Arizona home. Finally, this capstone project provides a professional cost estimate for the implementation of the proposed changes and a side-by-side look at the available “green” housing market, the utility cost savings for the homeowner, and the environmental benefits of individual as well as large-scale adoption of sustainable retrofitting practices. 
Description:
Sustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Project
Type:
text
Keywords:
sustainable housing; green building; retrofit; energy efficient
Degree Name:
Sustainable Built Environments
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Mentor:
Moeller, Colby
Instructor:
Iuliano, Joey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGoff, Jasonen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-18T18:25:20Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-18T18:25:20Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/584147en
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Projecten
dc.description.abstractClimate change and resource availability are arguably the two biggest challenges humanity faces going forward. An unprecedented body of scientific work has been compiled over the past thirty years that indicates humans have and continue to be the largest driver of these environmental concerns, and therefore must also be responsible for any solutions. Buildings and their construction account for nearly 40% of the total energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the United States. Water consumption by both buildings and thermoelectric power generation is also an issue, especially in the Southwest and Western United States. Green building has been gaining steam in the U.S. for the past two decades, but the primary focus has been in the commercial and industrial sectors. The residential markets have not seen the efficiency gains, primarily due to the perception that the cost isn’t worth the benefit. This project examines the need, feasibility, and potential benefits of sustainably retrofitting existing homes as an alternative to new construction. It provides a broad definition of sustainability and then focuses into a more narrow description of its application within the built environment. Using precedents, 3D modeling, and energy simulation software it compares the energy and water savings of a retrofit versus a base case as well as the performance of the average Southern Arizona home. Finally, this capstone project provides a professional cost estimate for the implementation of the proposed changes and a side-by-side look at the available “green” housing market, the utility cost savings for the homeowner, and the environmental benefits of individual as well as large-scale adoption of sustainable retrofitting practices. en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectsustainable housingen
dc.subjectgreen buildingen
dc.subjectretrofiten
dc.subjectenergy efficienten
dc.titleSustainability and Affordability: How Single-Family Home Retrofits Can Achieve Bothen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.nameSustainable Built Environmentsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en
dc.contributor.mentorMoeller, Colbyen
dc.contributor.instructorIuliano, Joeyen
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