Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/583201
Title:
Insects, Diseases and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands
Author:
DeGomez, Tom; Garfin, Gregg
Publisher:
College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)
Issue Date:
Nov-2015
Description:
Revised; Originally published: 2006; 5 pp.
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/583201
Abstract:
Recent events in the forests of the Southwest, and across western North America, have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Studies focusing on Arizona and other southwestern states point to multiple, interacting climate-related mechanisms that increase the propensity for forest mortality. Effects of insects on forests are complex, and species and site dependent. Many influences, such as drought, decreased precipitation, increased temperature, increased vapor pressure deficit, and increased stand density, combined in nonlinear and overlapping ways to create the recent and devastating pine bark beetle outbreaks in Arizona forests. Climate clearly plays a role in many, but not all, Southwest insect cycles. It is important that educators demonstrate the complexity of all of the interplaying issues, in order to communicate no false impressions of an “easy” or “one-size- fits-all” solution” for land managers.
Type:
text; Book
Language:
en_US
Keywords:
climate change; insects; diseases; abiotic; biotic; southwest; western; bark beetle; aspen; conifer; fire
Series/Report no.:
University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Service and Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin AZ1418-2015

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDeGomez, Tomen
dc.contributor.authorGarfin, Greggen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-03T16:40:41Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-03T16:40:41Zen
dc.date.issued2015-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/583201en
dc.descriptionRevised; Originally published: 2006en
dc.description5 pp.en
dc.description.abstractRecent events in the forests of the Southwest, and across western North America, have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Studies focusing on Arizona and other southwestern states point to multiple, interacting climate-related mechanisms that increase the propensity for forest mortality. Effects of insects on forests are complex, and species and site dependent. Many influences, such as drought, decreased precipitation, increased temperature, increased vapor pressure deficit, and increased stand density, combined in nonlinear and overlapping ways to create the recent and devastating pine bark beetle outbreaks in Arizona forests. Climate clearly plays a role in many, but not all, Southwest insect cycles. It is important that educators demonstrate the complexity of all of the interplaying issues, in order to communicate no false impressions of an “easy” or “one-size- fits-all” solution” for land managers.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCollege of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUniversity of Arizona Cooperative Extension Service and Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin AZ1418-2015en
dc.sourceCALS Publications Archive. The University of Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectinsectsen
dc.subjectdiseasesen
dc.subjectabioticen
dc.subjectbioticen
dc.subjectsouthwesten
dc.subjectwesternen
dc.subjectbark beetleen
dc.subjectaspenen
dc.subjectconiferen
dc.subjectfireen
dc.titleInsects, Diseases and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlandsen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeBooken_US
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