Individual Behavioral Phenotypes of the Cliff Chipmunk (Tamias dorsalis): Effects on Female Reproductive Success and Juvenile Habitat Selection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/582370
Title:
Individual Behavioral Phenotypes of the Cliff Chipmunk (Tamias dorsalis): Effects on Female Reproductive Success and Juvenile Habitat Selection
Author:
Kilanowski, Allyssa LeAnn
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Differences among individual responses to behavioral stimuli have been observed throughout a variety of taxa and these individual differences can affect female reproductive success and juvenile settlement decisions. In this study, we examined the effect of reversed sexual dimorphism on behavior phenotype and the effect of behavior on maternal reproductive success and juvenile dispersal of a fossorial rodent (Tamias dorsalis) in southeastern Arizona. We found that multiple behavioral phenotypes existed within this population and female litter size was not affected by behavioral type. We also found that natal habitat preference induction (NHPI) does occur at the population level, but only weakly occurs for the individual. We also found no effect of personality on site selection. Our results indicate that sex and mass may explain differences in behavioral phenotypes; however, individual behavioral differences are weakly related to female reproductive success and settlement decisions during juvenile dispersal.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Natural Resources
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koprowski, John L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIndividual Behavioral Phenotypes of the Cliff Chipmunk (Tamias dorsalis): Effects on Female Reproductive Success and Juvenile Habitat Selectionen_US
dc.creatorKilanowski, Allyssa LeAnnen
dc.contributor.authorKilanowski, Allyssa LeAnnen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDifferences among individual responses to behavioral stimuli have been observed throughout a variety of taxa and these individual differences can affect female reproductive success and juvenile settlement decisions. In this study, we examined the effect of reversed sexual dimorphism on behavior phenotype and the effect of behavior on maternal reproductive success and juvenile dispersal of a fossorial rodent (Tamias dorsalis) in southeastern Arizona. We found that multiple behavioral phenotypes existed within this population and female litter size was not affected by behavioral type. We also found that natal habitat preference induction (NHPI) does occur at the population level, but only weakly occurs for the individual. We also found no effect of personality on site selection. Our results indicate that sex and mass may explain differences in behavioral phenotypes; however, individual behavioral differences are weakly related to female reproductive success and settlement decisions during juvenile dispersal.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectNatural Resourcesen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKoprowski, John L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKoprowski, John L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMannan, Williamen
dc.contributor.committeememberChristianson, Daviden
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